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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1923"

GIFT 



LIBRARY 
AUGUSTA COLLEGE 




IN MEMORY OF 
Eleanor Henderson Edwards 






LIBRARY USE ONLY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/maidsandman19231923stud 



£SFOVrRr?» 



1925 



r^EW3 



Tin IP 



man 



PUBLISHeP By THE STUPei\T5 OF 

TUBMR HIGH 5CH00L 



^ovnxwYh 



-J- + 

OUH EFFORTS this yair in prcsnitinij the 
foinlh vohimt- of MAIDS AXD A MAX have 
bun e.vcrfcil to iiiiikc it a book jini-fli/ locul in char' 
after. ]Vf icish it to appeal primarili) to every 
Tubman girl and yet ice hope that an outsider wiU 
not fail to find its pages interesting. 0, reader 
gentle or othcr-icise, spare us odious eoniparisons. 
Our hopes are moderate. JTc <lo not 7cisli to sur- 
pass in sneeess our predeeessors. We only hope to 
make the spirit of our high sehool days live ami 
breathe in tite printed icord. 

—THE STAFF 



\ 




HE EDITORS 
a5 a roRen 
of e5:reeTn and 

dedicate rhis 

volumesroA^ 
A^DOROTHfHAINS 



LOmSE HOLMES 



Rook I. Tlir Si'liool 


Book II. 


VI It uses 


B:.()k III 

Book IV. .. . 


Organiziitions 

Activities 


I5oOK \'. 


Athletics 


Book \'I. 


Jest Smile 


Book VII. 


Feiit lives 


Book VIII 


Advert iseinents 




XHOOL 



p|i"Hlll|? 






iFarultij 



T. H. Garrett Prinripal 

Miss A. Dorothy Hains Liitiii 

Miss Ada (i. Woods Eiii/linh 

Miss Anxik M. Pai!E Frinrh 

Miss Julia A. Fiiscii U. S. Histori/ niirl Erimdiiiics 

Miss CIertruije J. Comey Eii</li.ili 

Miss Louise Parks Einilixli 

Miss Willamette IIreen Mdlhenuifitx 

Miss Anna H. Ward <-' ommercial Gi-niiritjiliii 

Mils. Marharet C. Hi-rst._.._ Ancimt Ilhloni 

Miss Mary H Hamilton MdlliciiiiiHrn 

Miss F'urlow Hollinciswoutii ('ommercial Sulijfcts 

Miss Marcia A. Clark Domestic Arts 

Miss I.ois Eve General Science 

Miss Lcra M. Pearce Eni/lixh 

Mrs. W. C. Kmerson Fht/sics anil Chemistrii 

Mi.ss Helen E. Frank '. _ Eiii/ll.ili 

Miss Mildred .Vbernathy- . Latin 

Miss Katherine M. Comfort _ Applied Art 

Miss Leonora Ivey Phi/sical Triiiniiui 

Mi.ss Louise Chiles ' Einilish 

Miss Jeanne Turner I'o al Music 

Mi.ss Ama Lee Nuli Spanish 

Miss Eleanor Hoatwrigtit Civics and Modern Hislnri/ 

Miss EnwiNE M'. OnoM Chemislrii and Bii>lot/i/ 

Miss Nancv E. HAi>ro:.K Domestic Scieiice 

Miss Ann Hraddy Malhemiitics 

Miss Sallie Kutleloe General Science 

Miss ^L\r:ox Hamiiton Civics and Ancient Ilisloni 

iMiss Helen Anderson _ /■'rencli 

Miss C:i:na Callaway '. Miitli: malics 

Miss Eunice Adams Malliemalics 

Miss Leah White.. Assistant Commercial Departmer.l 

iliss Emma Plunkett -Issistant (1 iimnasirin 

Mrs. Stannard Owens _ 'jAlirarian 

Miss Loi isE Wilson. Sellout Secretani 




a tubman ^trl 

+ + 

Every d;iy and in every wa\ 

These are the tliinfjs we do and say. 

7 A. M. 

A^ain tliat old alarm eloek ]ieals t'ortli its 

warning note. 
I get up and sliake and sliiver and "it 

surely gets my goat." 

8 A. M. 

Same old coffee, sanu* old tofist, same old 

eggs and then 
I nnist get the Tubman S|)eeial or I'll 

be late again. 

9 A. M. 

Missed the Si)eeial — I am late. With 

other tardies I've a date. 
One more had mark on the hook; from my 

teacher one black look. 

10 A. M. 

I've "flunked" my math by that "hum guess"— 

I surely wish it were recess. 
Then there comes what I like best — a 

nice long, juicy Latin test. 







'ft/Ji ' O. 






11 A. M. 

Now to Eiifrlisli I'lii.ss I fiiJ, with n-lMctiiiit 

st('|) ;ind slow. 
I want to practice for Hu- Icain hut I must fxi) 

and write a tiienie. 

12:15 P. M. 

In tlie luncln-ooMi — watch ycnir ste]) — 
Getting ice cream requires pep, 

Hifr red ap|)!e; sandwieli fat; tlic contest 
nearly UnocUed mc flat. 

1 P. M. 

I want to use my |iou(ler and jiainl. Oh. 

dear me! I'm frointr to faint! 
In liiohj^y I'm a nut. Fr<)j;s and fisli Just 

can't he cut. 

2:10 P. M. 
Joy oh .joy! there goes Ihe lu-h. To ,ill c.ire 

I say fai'ewell. 
'i'hc howling moli mo\<'s to the street. .M;iyhe — 

I will get a seat. 

4-3 P. M. 
To the movies now we sneak to see de.ir liodoljili 

in "The Sheik." 
I read his life in Photoplay — W hy can't 1 see 

him every day? 

8-11 P. M. 
Study — study —cram -cram -cram cir I'll 

"flunk" that old exam. 
There's the door hell — nuist he Jim. Enough 

of this ! I'll go see him. 

11:30 P. M. 
Once again I'm tucked in hed - tired, sleepy, 

nearly dead. 
Time I've wasted to my sorrow hut 

I'll do nnich more tomorrow. 





+ + 

(Class Poem) 

On the sea of knowledge clear 

We launched our gallant ship; 
Beset by many a hope and fear. 

For a long, successful trip. 

Our teachers dear, the pilots brave, 

All pointed out the way 
That led us to the treasures rare 

Far out beyond the Inty. 

With faith in the course of our jiilots, 

We [)ulled to reach our goal, 
Willi highest hopes and a will to do 

In ever\ class-mate's soul. 

We gazed thru the fog and mists ahead 

And watclied the billows flow. 
And saw our distant treasure-land 

Nearer and nearer grow. 

Four long years passed swiftly liy 

Kach one doing our best; 
We pulled with might, from morn 'til night 

To gain our longed-for quest. 

L'i>on the storm-tossed .sea, each day 

From early dawn to dark. 
Sailing steadily on and on 

We steered our sturdy bark. 

Now we behold the shore once small 

Has come within our reach 
We're landing near our treasure-land 

On a happy, sunny beach. 

And now before us stands our jiri/.e, 

A .synd)ol of work well-done. 
And .scores of hands stretch out to gr.isp 

The treasure we have won. 

In the wake of our good old life-boat, 

On a shining path so bright. 
Come other boats with steady bows 

Set toward the shore of light. 

To the Juniors we leave our pilots 

And their knowledge — a bounteous st(M'e — 

And we wish theiri a ])eaceful voyage 
In nineteen twenty-four. 

^Mitni llriilh 



'^ntnr flIUisa 



4. 4. 

Class Colors — Bed and Wliitc Class Flower — Tied Poppij 

Class Motto — "To do, not to dream; to be, not to aeeni." 



OFFICERS 

Cecilia Baker President 

An- ABEL Powell ....Vice-President 

Grace Ethekepge Secret an/ 

WiLHELJiixA Theilixg Treasurer 



KATHLEEN ALLEN 
' Brown Eyes" 
'resiilellf. Glei' ('liih •L'.'i. 



CECILIA BAKEK 
"Teto" 

Cliiss I'lvsidiMit 'J(i. -lil. -JL'. ■■S.\: C:i|itiiiii Kaskft Bnll 
'2(1; Foiirtli ErHshiii:in Ildckev Tenm '20; Ciiptain V;irsit.v 
Basket Ball '21; Ilciikey Team '21; Basket Ball '21; Maiiat;ei- 
Varsity Basket Ball '22: Meuiher of Eureka '22: President 
Athletic Assrieiatieii '2:1; Basket Ball '2:5; Chairiiiail Meiii- 
liership Committee Uirl Reserves '2:f ; Varsity Basket Ball 
'2:i. 



ELNORA BENNETT 

Iloekey 'I'lvaiii 'LMI : Hoi-key Team '21: 
Club '2:;. 



lasehall '21; (ilee 









ELIZABETH BURDELL 
■■Baby" 
F(Miiili Ilnckc.v TiMTu ■:;u; Basket Kail ■22. 



MINNIE COHEN 
'■Minky'^ 

Basket Ball -20; Hockey Team 20: Basket Ball ■21; 
Hotkey Team 21 ; Suhstitute Varsity Basket Ball 21 ; 
Basket Ball ^22. 



FRANCES CONNER 
"Geke'^ 



Uleo Cluh '2: 



KATHERINE DAVIS 

■■Kaf 
Iliickey Team ■lil. 



LOUISE DICKS 

"Dickens" 



HENRIETTA DUNN 
■ Henny" 



MARGARET DUNN 
"Maggie" 

Kiiiirth Iliic-ki'v Thmiii '2I): ThiiiiIs TH;ini 'iil : Hockpy 
Team '21: liaseliall Jl ; Basket Ball I'l' ; Varsity Basket 
Ball '22 ; Member nf Eureka 22: Editor-in-chief of Annual 
'23; Social Chairman (iirl Reserves '23. 



HENRIETTA EGBERT 











GRACE ETHEREDGE 

Hockey T«im L'O ; Kepresentiitive Honor League Council 
'Ul ; Assistant Art Kilitur Anjiual '22: Art Editor Annual 
•2:!; Clec ('lull '2:1: CImss Secretary ■28. 



DELLE EVANS 
"Pickles" 



CARRIE FORD 



OLA FRANKLIN 
"Oleander" 



H.i.vkcl H:ill 23. 



MARY WILLIE FULCHER 



ROSE FUNK 



GLADYS GARY 



JANELLE GIBBS 
■■Jack" 

Assistant Photograiih Kclit.ir Aiimi.il 'L'L' ; riintofrraiih 
Kilitnr Animal '23. 







GUSSIE GRUSIN 
"Goosie" 



MARY HEATH 

Hockey Te;nii 'Jd ; Basket B.ill 'lil : Hockey Te;iiii 21: 
Basket Ball '21'; Varsity Basket Ball 22; Meiuher of Ku- 
reka 22: Basket Ball LVi : Varsity Basket Ball "23: Glee 
riiih Si. 



MARTHA HILL 

"Mathilda" 

F. Mirth Hockey Teniii '20: Treasurer Athletic Associa- 
lii.ri 22; Basket Ball '22: Varsity Basket Ball 22; Meiiiher 
uf Eureka '22; Basket Ball '2:!; Varsity Basket Ball ■2:;. 



NELLIE HOLDEN 



MARCELLA HOLMAN 

• Sally" 
lldi-lif.v 'IVniii -Jit: B.-iskft Hull L".'. 



BERNICE HUTCHESON 



RUTH JOHNSON 



MARY JONES 



SARAH JORDAN 



ELMA KEENER 

Cheer I,pa(ler "20: Vice President Class '20; Unsket H.1II 
•20; Hooliey Team '20; Basltet Ball '21; Basl<et Ball 22. 



MINNIE KREISBERG 



BLANCHE LEHMANN 
' Joe" 

I''.ilillli II. 1. key Team L'O ; Vire ITesideiil Atlilelic As- 
Sdcialioii '22: Kasl;et Ball ^J ; l;.>|in-seiila( i\ c Allilelii- As- 
socialioii '2:;: \'iee Presidenl (iirl UcMTNes ■2:'.. 



FLORENCE LESTER 
• Flo" 

Basket Bull -M; lliickey Teiim '21) : Bnskct Bull -JI : 
Hockey Team '\ll: Assistant Kditor-iii-i'hief Animal ':i- : 
Basket Ball '22: Varsity Basket Ball '22; President Titian 
Cluli '22; Orchestra "22: Menilier of Eureka '22: President 
Titian f'lnli '2:!; Sclmiil Pianist '2:',; lilec Clnh '2:!. 



MARY MATHENY 
"Molly" 

Hockey Team '21; Basket Ball S.i; Varsity Basket Ball 
'23: Treasurer (iirl Keserves *2:i : Honor Lea^:ne Keiiresen- 
tative '2.'i. 



MILBRA McGAHEE 
"Pat" 



ETHEL MILLER 

Basket Ball -20; Basket Ball 21: 11 • l.,.a-ne (■,>nn(il 

■21: Basket Ball -22. 







ETHEL MONTGOMERY 



DOROTHY MOORE 
•Dot" 



inc<. Chill -JO, '21. 



SARA MOORE 
• Sally" 



MARGARET MURPHY 



WYNELLE OTWELL 
■ Little Nellie" 



Chci'i- I,(..iilcT 



ARBEL PANKNIN 



MARY PETREA 



LOUISE PLUMB 
"Lu Plu" 







EFFIE PLUNKETT 

Haskct l;:ill U(l; I'.nsi-liMll Ti-Mlii -Jl : I'.Mski-r Hull '21 : 
Hockey TiMiii -Jl : Tn-ilsiiriT Atllli-lii- Assi>i-i.il iciii 'lil : 
H.iskcl V.:\U JJ. 



ANABEL POWELL 
"Little Sister" 

\'icT Pri'sidcnt Class "lil : Set-retary ilnnor League Coun- 
cil --! : Assistant Business Manager Annual '22; Vice Presi- 
licjit Class '22: Ktisiness Manager Annual '-'i; Vice Presi- 
ilcrif class '2;i : Presideiit Hciniir League Council '2'A: Chair- 
man Social CoMinntt4'e (;ii-l lies(M'ves '2o. 



HELEN PROBYN 

Il(^c■kc■y Team '211: Hockey Team '21; (ilee Clul> '21; Basket 
liall '22: N'arsity Basket Hall '22: Member of Eureka '22; 
Assistant Athletic Kilit<»r Annual '22; Kepresentatiye Honor 
League Coniu'il '22: \'arsily Baski'l Hall '2:'.; Basket Ball 
'2:;: Athletic Editor Annual '2:;. 



BESSIE ROSENBLATT 
' Bassanio" 
lloikey Team '211: Sccri'larv Tiliaii I'luli "22. '2:i. 



FANNIE SANDLER 
• Fan Tan" 
Hiisel);lll Tram L'l : H:iskcr H:ill li:!. 



THELMA SEIGLER 
• Pep" 



VIRGINIA SEVIER 

Treasurer Athletie Assoeiation '20; Hockey Team 20; 
Baseliall Team 20: Swimminij Team '21; Tennis Squad '21; 
Literary Kditiir Annual '23. 



LOUISE SMITH 







DORIS SPETH 
"Half Pint" 



I'lleer LniuU'r 



EDNA STRAUSS 
F..iirlh ll.)(ki-y TiMin Jd : Biiski-I Hall 



GRACE STRAUSS 

lloc-kc.y Tc.iii] -M: H.isflpiiU Tciilil 21: Assistaiil Literary 
Plilitor Animal ■.!2 : Basket Ball '22: Varsity Basket Ball 
-22: Member of Eureka '22; Basket Ball '23; Varsity Basket 
Ball -2:). 



ESSIE TANT 



WILHELMINA THEILING 
Fiiiirlh Iliii-ki'y Ti';nii L'd : CImss Treasurer '2:: 




JANIE TOMMINS 
"Jinks" 

Captain l<'oiirtli Hockey Team 'liO : IlDckey Team '21 ; 
Sei-retary and Treasurer Class '21, 22; President Senior 
(iirl Keserves CInli '2:i. 



FRANCES WALTON 



JAYME WEEKS 
"Laugliing Jim" 

Kaskct Kali '211: Ilcjckey Team '20; Kaskel Ball '21; Cap- 
tain Basket Ball '22: Varsity Basket Ball '22: Member o( 
E\ireka '22; Ke|iresentatiye Athletic Couneil '22; Basket 
Ball 2:!; (;lee Cliili S.i. 






FLORENCE EDITH WESCOAT 



ALICE FRANCES WOODBURY 
"Slim" 



SARAH WYLY 



T . /. . / 




:;:<;^ 



.-w 



.^ 



-^;J< 



1?" 



J 



V> 







A 



r~ — ; 



u 




Class Colors — Blur iiin! Whitf Class Flower — Sxceet Pea 

Motto — "ll'f wUl find II way ur make one." 

OFFICERS 

A 1)1)1 E MrxDAV President 

Ei.izAKET}! Uowi.ixt; V ice-Prestdent 

Ei.i/,Ai!ETH KiiEi's - Seeretary 



,\ii;lllis. ilU'/, 

Ah'XiiiiiU'r. II;ii-rift 
Anderson, (iracc 
Andrews. ^Ijiritni 
B;ilk. Lonise 
BnllenfiTic. Hillie 
Bnrtlctt, Mnrv 
Kiixley. ll.irv L.iii 
Kiddin;;-. Katlu'riiic 
Blii.-k. .M;ir(li;i 
P.lit(diiiiHtun. Lciiiise 
Hr;i\vrii'r. Annie Sni' 
Kii,v<l. IsoliMii' 
Hrisecie, Miirv 

Ki ks. Emily 

KriMvn. Mni-y 
P.nc-k. Liridse.A' 
Bnssey. Mnndii- 
t'nin. drri*' 
t'jirswell. Alire 
Chancy. Bessie 
Chaimiiin. Enniee 
Crawfnrd. Karhnrine 
Crenshaw, Kli/.alietli 
Criswell. Jlartha 
DnwliiiK. Elizalielh 
linwliiifr. Sarah 
Itnrden. (:eur;;ia 
Ellintt. Annie 
Evans, Helen 
lOvans. Hnrtdhy 
Einkelstein. Unse 
Eraser, Knsa 
(ireen, Sarah 
(Ireene, Madeline 
<t miter, Ella Mae 
*in.v, Marie 
(luytiiii, Carrie 



Hiinlin, 
Ilarlev, 
lliUiin. 
Ilintnn. 
Hi.\snn. 
Ilixsen. 



Knth 
Erane* 
Mvra 
Knth 
Ivv 
Onie 



Ii<>y:an. Lillian 
Holinan. liillian 
Ildwell, Carnlvn 
.larksnii. .Marv .M -rr ■ 
Junes. Blanfdn' 
.tunes. .Mary B. 
.Tnrdan, Katherine 
Kahrs. Mary .Vniia 
Krejts. Eli/.alieth 
Lan;rstiin. .\nnie Lee 
Lawrence. Annie ilae 
Lawrence, Knby 
Leary, Hn/.el 
Leary, ,Marie 
I>*e, Sara 
Linv. Ilonithv 
Lcrid;harl, .Margaret 
Li.inhard, Ilornthv 
M.llerie. Elsie 
Martin. Annie :\lae 
.Merry. .Vatalie 
Meyer. Ln(dle 
Jliller. .Maxine 
^Icinre. Katherine 
Mnrt'an. Lillian 
Jliirjian. Mary 
Morris. Eleanrir 
Murris. JIary 
Jlorris. .Mattie 
Mnndav. Addie 
MaiMnr|>hv., Helen 
McDaniel. .\ndrina 
Nnrris. Lnida 
(lliver. ElizalMdh 



I'ahner. lOva Mae 
I'eiddes. Alice 
Perkins. Alic-e 
Plninli. Mar.y 

I' Is. Iloriithy 

Ponds. Laiiree 
Power. Louise 
Pnnil. I>or(dhy 
lininn. Lanra 
Ueese. Lonise 
l!evn,,lds. Sara Belle 
Kiillehoover. Sarah 
Uhcne^'. .Inlia 
Kosenthal. Kosidli' 
Sawilowsk.^■. I'inniee 
Sclninfele. Maxine 
Scinnnacher. Katherine 
Sims. Marie 

S|»r;ldlev. (Jrace 
Steed. .Tennii' Cl.lire 
Tahli. I)<^rothy 
Tanenhauni. Sarah 
Tillman. Benlah 
Thompson, .\delaide 
Toole. .Naomi 
Tnnkle. Sadie 
Tyler. Marion 
Wall. Mar-aret 
Walton. Patsy 
Weltidi. Addie Sue 
White. Lillie 
W hillock. Lucille 
AVicker. Dovie 
Wolfe. Deryl 
Wren. Louise 
Wright. Marjiaret 
VoniiK. Cecil 
Zealy. Mary 



'njjlinmnrr (EUtBis 



Class Colors — Pfirj)h' tnid (ioUl PMowor — Pans// 

Motto — ^"llirouyJi the Dust to fiu- Sfars^' 

OFFICERS 

Katherine Wiggins... ..President 

Isabel North ....Vice-President 

May White Secret art/ 



Adams, Kate 
Alexander, Martha 
Andrews, Kebeeca 
Arnol<l, Emma 
Beale, Gertrude 
Bell. Dorothy 
Bell. Velma 
Best, LeiiiTa 
Bothwell. Ida 
Braindi. Catherine 
Broivn. Kluiur 
Bnrch. Evelyn 
Bnrjiamy, Ethel 
Biirney, Uuth 
Bush. Margaret 
Butler. Louise 
Canuiiii. Mvrtis 
Cartled-e. Ali.-e 
Cnipehind. Ina Sue 
< 'renshaw. Emmie 
Culpepper, Marjraret 
Culpepper, Meryl 
Hanforth. Aliee 
I)esC(>mIies. Vivian 
Downing', Mahel 
Edmunds, Elise 
Edwards. Gladys 
Edwards, Kuth 
Fell, Nellie 
F\>rts()n, Mariha 
Franklin. Sara 
Frederick, Helen 
Friedman. Mollie 
Fuller, B^rances 



Fuller. (Ware 
Fuller. rUilnniena 
(iay. Fannie 
<;n<dsl>y. Vernelle 
(il<trdun. Emily 
<;reene, Christine 
Greene. Kuth 
(Irnssma n, Lla 
Hall. Lillie May 
Hawkins, Ethel 
Heath. Lillie 
Heath. Violet 
Helm, Irma 
Henry. Lucy 
Hersev, Marv 
Hill. C.iroline 
Hill. ElizalM-tli 
Hitl. Alma 
Holley. M:iy 
Holmes. Ijoiiise 
Hnyt. Melitta 
nu;:hes, Lorena 
Jester. Lil:i 
Johnson. Ma r;^ a ret 
Keeiie. Faye 
Kennicott. Llewellyn 
Kiu^^ Mar^iie 
Lamli. 'I'insii' 
Lamar. Mary 
Lass. Annie La urie 
Latimer. (Hjja 
Lester. Martha 
Mathewes. Mary 
Maxwell. Lula 



.Miller. Eulalia 
Miller. Gla.Ivs 
Mills. Willie Mae 
Morrison, Cora Lee 
Murphey, (iladys 
Murphey, \'ir^iiiia 
Move. Catherin*- 
.McDonald, Margaret 
McElmnrray. liillie 
:McKlniurrav. Horotliv 
McFlninrr:iv. .Mildred 
McEuen. Gladys 
McLendon. Elizaln-th 
N<)rrell. Fr.inces 
Norris. Sarah 
North. IsaI.el 
<His. Klizalieth 
( >\veiis, Chuidine 
(Iwens. .Mildred 
( )'Connor, Lessle 
O'Neal. Beriiiee 
Panknin. Elizal)eth 
Pearl. Kosina 
Peterson. Iconise 
Phillips. Emma 
PrintU|). Kuby 
Quinn. Susie 
Kal.un. Julia 
Keal). Laura 
lleeves. Adele 
lleildin^i-, Helen 
Kevnolds. Edna 
Po-ers. Hattie 
Uosenian. Vet fa 



K<»sier. Nellie 
Sacre. Minnie 
Samnions. Lucia 
Sawilowsky. Belle 
Scarlioronjih, May belle 
Senn. Itessie 
Sharpton. Lillian 
Sikes, .Mary 
Siinpsuii. Delia 
Siniowitz. Ijouise 
Sizemorl^ .\rvonia 
Smith. Bertha 
Smith. Dorothy 
Smith, guilla 
Spa uldiii;^'. Kose 
Spiers, Nina 
Sylvester. Doraselle 
Steed. Lois 
Story. Elizabeth 
Summers, .Vlice 
Swindell, A'enera 
Vaujihn, Minnie 
Wall. Ida 
Wells, (irayson 
Weseoat. .Marguerite 
Whaler. Kubv 
White. May 
Wiuuius. Katherine 
Wilder. Elizabeth 
Wilhelui. Inez 
Wilkerson. .Vnnie Mae 
Williams. Florimel 
Winter. Virginia 
\\'oodall. .Mary 



Andrews. Lucy 
Bishoji. A'ivian 
Brown, .\jrnes 
Burnett. Until 
Co<ike. Dorothy 
Corley. \'a u;ihan 



Half Advanced 

Edwiirds, Marv 
Lanford. .Vllie Mav 
Malhenv. (Jlailys 
Newtnill. S;idie 
P.irks. Lucile 
Phillips. Hilda 



Iteid. Mar;raret 
S;innders. Ileb-n 
Skinner. Pessie 
Siiarin, .\liee 
SteiulM-r;.^ Sarah 
Whitloid;, Euni<-e 




■^ 




11 ii . .i.ii 

SHINING LXAMPL&3 
OF 

s 

G 

P 
Ii 

o 



A PONTIC QR.OUP 




o 

R 
S 




5IS1II1C! SNIfit! 



fILt GN H 




HIAWATHA? 




POGT GP THE- CLA55 






FRESHMAN 




Class C'oiors — Phik and White Class YUnyor-Pin/i Ho.sc Buil 

OFFICERS 

\Vii,Mix.\ Row I. AX I) - - President 

Mildred Garrett Vice-President 

Helen McEwex ....Secretari/ and Treasnrer 



Abnett. Marie 
Al(lric-h, Jfssie Mae 
Ainlersiin. Kuth 
Baniiester, Ruby 
Baxter, Frances 
Klaek. P^rances 
Klaiifl. Frances 
liiiiioii. Cl.v<le 
Bolin, Krma 
Bouterse. Beiilah 
Bouterse, (J race 
Boyce. Mary E. 
Broome. Verdine 
Burton. Willie Mai' 
Carswell. Vera 
Chew. Mary 
Cogffins, Kate 
Corbett. Melvioe 
Ciirrie. Margaret 
D'Antignac. Martha 
1 )aviiIson, Jean 
Iti<ks, Dor.ithy 
I>i(ks. Helen 
Downing:. Clemmie 
Dye, Xona 
Dve. Kuth 
Dykes. Lnllie Mae 
Fair. Laura 
Feiinell. Helen 



Feniiell. Maurice 
Fletcher. Marv 
Fiske. Mary 
Flemiii}:. Virg:iiiia 
Forrl. Alice 
Fonl. ^Marguerite 
Fnlcher. Eloise 
Garrett, Mildred 
(lilchrist. Erliiie 
(ireene. Myrtle 
(iunn, JIargaret 
Hag.MKl. Id;i Mae 
Hair. Ruby 
Ilauiilton. Elsie 
Ilardnian. Katherine 
Harvey. Miblre.l 
Harvin. Mary W. 
Haslett. Frances 
Hattawav, Leunoru 
JIniden. Lydia 
ILdley. Arvis 
Plooper, Annie Dora 
Hciward. Langhurne 
Hughes. Eninia 
Hughes. Eulawene 
Hutcheson. Ola 
Jackson. Margaret 
Johanson. Ruby 
Johnson. Floride 
Jnhnscpii. Uubyt' 



Jones. Clemmie 
Jones. Elizabeth 
Kellv. Lillian 
Kelly. Lois 
Lucky. Juanita 
Jlcirgan. Katie 
Morris, Virginia 
Moye. Louise 
Murrah. Martha 
:\Ic('urniick. Elton 
McDaniel. Evelyn 
IMcEInuirra.v. .Margaret 
McElniurray. May 
^Ii-Ewen. Helen 
McXair. Margaret 
Neary. Mera 
Xorris. Susie 
( Hiver. Louise 
< iweiis, Marjorie 
I'arks. Margaret 
l';itM. Blojulelle 
I't-rkins. Helen 
rinnkett. Sue 
I'owell. Alice 
I'uwell. Blanche 
Rogers. Voncile 
Rowland. Wilniina 
Sat<dier. Ennnal.vne 
Sawilowsky. Es telle 
Scha ntidi'. lonn 



Si-hneid4'r. Heline 
Sellears. Eula 
Serotta. Rebecca 
Sharpe. Edna 
Shellhouse. Lucile 
Sheitpard. Sara 
Shivers. Asenath 
Sininions, Hazel 
Smith. Ellen 
Smith. Evelyn 
Steed. HeleJi 
Steinberg. Theresa 
Stringer. Marguerite 
Swain, Louise 
Taggert, Florence 
Tanenliauni. Minnie 
Th(»mpson. All)erra 
Tinley. Mary 
Toiuniins, Alinnie 
Trigg. Ellen Lyon 
Turner. Anna Belle 
Turner. Margaret 
Vignati. Rosa 
Walla<e. Betty 
Warner. Elizabeth 
AVafkins. Edna 
Wcigle. Kate Louise 
\\hitaker. Mildred 
\\'inter, Caroline 




Armstrong. iMarv 
Bassford. Marv Let- 
*Bell, Helen 
Bell. Sarah 
Benson, Louise 
Bolin, Mary 
Brawner, (ieorgia 
Bovd. Leli;i Mae 
lirazelle. Miidre.i 
i:rn(dvs. Mary Elh-n 
* 'a iithiMi, LouisH 
1 'larkt*. Frances 
Currv. 4'atherine 
Culley. Cora 
rrenshaw, Helen 
Davis. Lucile 
Ellison. Mary 



Half Advanced 

(ia rner, lOnla 
(iuthric. Minnie 
Hall. Dolores 
Hall, ridiiie 
Harper. Maurene 
lloyt. (;e()rgine 
I loi)])mann. Lucille 
Jani.'s. Meryl 
Jt.plin. Catherine 
Knhlkc. Rhinrhe 
Langlt-y. Doris 
J.innba rd. Riibv 
.Miles. Marv 
,A!ilb.r. Leone 
I'hillips. Emma 
Rower. May Belle 
Randall. Die/, 



Reid, Carolyn 
Reese. Marie 
Rhodes, Sunie 
Rogers, Louise 
Scott. Bessie 
Sheiilev, P^ugenia 
Shimoft", Pearl 
Steeil, DhUi' 
Thnm|)soii. Louise 
Trowliridire. Lucile 
Walttni. <;ussie 
AVard. Ruth 
Whitaker, Willie Mne 
Wilcox. Julia 
Wilensky. Jfiinie 

Wilhite. Alice 
^^'olt■e. Frances 



*Died April 14. llHi.'J 







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OFFICERS 

LoiisE Garuett - ....President 

Virginia Williamson.. ..Vice-President 

Elizabeth Akerman Secretary 

Helen Walters . .Treasurer 

Adams, Kiith I)(ini. Klizalieth Joliaimsnii. (Jiissic Uuwlanil. Louise 

Aki'i-maii, Klizalii'lh IHiini. Lnnisi' .IipIiiischi. Sailii' KiiIihu, Kosa 

Allen. lOlsic I>miliar. l<]lizaln'(li .Ionian. Itulh Schni'ider. Sophie Lee 

Anderson. .Vnnie Itnnliani. I^liz.alieth Lanuir. Car.v Seott. Virginia 

Atkinson. Elizal)etli D.vclies. Klinof Lev.v. Yelta Seals, (iraee 

Bailie. Mar^iaret Klliotr. Irene Lewis. .7e«*el Smith. .leanette 

Baird. Sarah Evans, llelli.' Littleton. Helen Smith. Morallise 

Barrett. Ann Keniler. Henlali Livel.v. Donnie Snioak, Marion 

Barton. Lndie Koster, Jnlia L.vnch. Ida Speth. Domth.v 

Bell. .Inlia (iarner. Everlee JIaddo.x. .Allierta Sjiradle.v. (iwe'nilol.vn 

Berr.v. Ljiudle (larrett. Louise Maddox. Arline Street. Ellen 

Billion, Hilda (Ja.v. .\lice Maddox. Thehna StrinuiT. JIur>,'uerite 

Blaekstone. Inez, <;;i,v. .\nnie Lou ^lalone.v. Emnni Stuart. Vir^'-inia 

Bothwell, .Mar.v (Jetzen. Francis JIarkwalter. Floretta Suinnierall, Ilattie 

Bowers. Mariett.a t;o4'tehius. (iertrude Matheny. Katherine Sumner. .Mariiaret 

Boxs. lOvelvn Ccdilslein. Kachel M.ixwell. .leannette Tanenhaum Minnie 

Bric-kle. Wvleiia (ir.il.lowsk.v. Miriam Meeier. Lillie Tli.Huas. .Maliel 

Britt. lOthid Cunii. Etlnd M.diley. .lean 'I'liounis. .\orni.i 

Britlon. .\lar-arel Cunler, I'e.irl Monlcrii'f. Erie Timuieruian. Enim.a Lou 

Broadwater. Katie Il.iir. lOllna .\loori\ Elizaliel li TrowliridK'e. Xell 

Bu<k. Cladys Hall. Kvelyu .Morini;-. Frankie Turner. l!cd)liie 

Biirney. Lneile Hamilton. Thelma Murjihey. Laura \'a n I'ell, Ltpis 

Bvr{l, Haltie H.ivird. Dora .Muriihy. JIarv \'erilery Catherine 

Byrd. Stella Hancoek. Iris .Muridiy. .\ddie Vo^elsauf,'. Paula 

Cates, Malde Hancoi-k, Nellie MeCartv. Lidia Belle Wade. Louise 

("aclle. .lennie Hankinsi>n. Stella McCorimick. Dorothy Walters. Helen 

I'haneey. Thelma Hardy. Beatriee Neildiny. Nancy Waters. Bertha 

ChaniUer. Klizalieth Heath. Thelma OConnor. Mae M'atkins. Caroline 

I'ofrnins. Christine HiL:i;s. Odessa l)lliri(h. Jlar^'uerite M'elih. Hattie 

Coh.ui. D.irn Ilildelirandt. Jlar^uerite (IXeal. M.irKaretfe Wells. Marie 

Cook. Irene Hill. Susie Owiuis. \lii-i> M'haley. Ltiln 

Copeland. Elli'u Ilo^an. Vivian Owiuis. .\larv Whitney. Sarah 

Copeland. Sarah Hollcy. Bessie I'.irker. Annie Widener. .Myrtle 

Crawford. Lu<illc llonie. Kuth I'atcdi. Dorcdhy Wi!-'«ius. It'uth 

Crenshaw. Lucilc Howard. Myrtle I'.'ti'rson. Doridhy Williamson. Lilli.an 

Crook. Ethid Humphrey. Vivian I'eters. .Marv \\illi.imsoTi. Virj;inia 

Cnllcy. ;Marion Hutlo. KuKenia I'ilcher. Klizalieth Wooils. ,\la r(;.iret 

D.ily. Uosa ln;;li>tt. Thelma I'oole. .Mary Wright. (Iladys 

Dcas, Dorothy .laeksun. Until I'reacher. Mary Veartv. .\nnie 
.lennintts. Billy Beeves.. Elsie 

Half Advanced,'"; 

.\nd4Tsoii. Keliie K.lwinls. Florrie Lockhart; Mary Uaiii^rl. Laur.i 

Baili'V. Ilssii' Elli(dl, .Margaret LoU'.;. .leuell Sin;;letarv. Klizalieth 

Baird. Ailinc Karris. Nettie M;icMuriiliv'. Adele Stoniker ' Ilattie 

Benson. .Mildred Crear. Evelyn Maddox, (ihulys Story, liuth 

Brown. Louise Criencr. Mollie ^ladilox. Mildred Stnr'man. Klizalieth 

Capers. Clara (Jrnsin. Bessie JIartin. Berijice Summerau. Nell 

Capfrs. Ernestine Ilarrell, Catherine Mnrphev, Beiit'rioe Teaslev. Klizalieth 

Conor. Edith Harris. Mary Murphey. Florence Watson. Lola Belle 

D.ividson. Lila Humphrey. Charlie Bell .Mi-Carlv. Louis^ , Wi<lener. Cerlie Lou 

Davis. Bennola Hurl. Maud rallrowitz. Auiiie Williams. Smile Itovd 

Diil're. .I,.\vell Ivcy. Kdiia rrili-hard, MdrV Margaret Wilson. Ethel 

Knit;lit. Kuth ."/... 




«>Ue)§ - THEIR OWN PAGL 




ORGAN IZATIOhS 

) Dt>wii by * j««.leu'» p»-rfc»n wKoj,«<, nat kxlonjj ^ 




cUlj^ (!II|cirt0t Sar^ 

Bt'lidkl, two fhai-iots afe racing 
As down life's pathway they go. 
Which will you choose for your journey 
In the battle against the foe? 
Watch, in the race of these chariots, 
See how quickly they run ; 
Then decide which is worth-while trying 
In this race you have barely begun. 

One is a snow-white cliariot 

With flowers and garlands bedecked, 

Fair lilies of truth and of justice — 

In its course it has never been wrecked. 

Honesty rides in this chariot 

And guides through the storms of the world, 

Ever coining forth as a victor 

Witli lier banner jiroudly unfurled. 

The other, a coal lilack chariot. 
Waves banners of darkest hue; 
In its shadow lurk shame and disaster, 
.\ll tilings that are false and untrue. 
It crumbles and crushes ambitions 
For the highest and truest and best, 
For Dishcuiesty owns it and guides it. 
And his is a conscienceless quest. 

r ishonesty seizes the reins with a jerk. 

And speeds on his reckless course; 

While Honesty strives with a steady hand 

To con(pier, with truth as her force. 

Onward she speeds with a purpose, 

Unhampered by fraud and by lies, 

'i'ill she reaches the goal ere her rival; 

And the shouts touch the dome of the skies. 

Ascend fair Honesty's chariot, 
With faith in its straight-forward way; 
Waver not at meeting tem])tations 
That come to you day after day; 
For truth is stronger than falsehood 
And right than heavy-armed wrong. 
And the race will go to that chariot 
Whose driver by truth is made strong. 

— Mary Heath 




\\\\\v\\nnTvn-r> 



Bnnnr IC^agu^ Qlounril 

AxAUKi, I'owKLi. .President 

A 1. Mil ox AxDKKws Secret (irij 

He LEX I'iioiivx Senior Re present atix'c 

Ivy Hixsox Jiniior KepresentutixH' 

Gektuide ^v.\\.v..... Sophomore He present ative 
Blanche \s.vui,KV.....Freslnn(ni Nepresentatizw 

Miss AVii.i.ame tte (iheex Mrs. M. Htmsst 

Far lilt 11 HepreKeiitdtives 




.M. l)i x.\ 

A. I'OWKI.I, 

.M. LocKifAur 

H. I'UOHVX 
D. PlM) 



S. RlDLEHOOVEK 

V. Sevip:i{ J. GiBBs 

M. Briscoe M. Andkews 

(i. Ktherei)(;e 
.1. (". Steed 



Annual ^tuff 

SENIOR EDITORS 

Marc Alt ET Drxx Editor-iii-Chief 

ViKGixiA Sevier Lit era r// Editor 

Helen Probyx ..Athletic Editor 

Jaxelle Gibbs Picture Editor 

AxABEi, Powell.. Business Manager 

Grace Etheredge Art Editor 

JUNIOR ASSISTANT EDITORS 

Sarah Kidle hoover Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Briscoe Assistant Literari/ Editor 

Dorothy Puxd Assistant Athletic Editor 

Marion Andrews Assistant Picture Editor 

Margaret LocKHART....^-i*«M^rt7;/ Business Manager 
Jennie Ci.aike Steed -Issistant .irt Editor 



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tubman (^ht (EUth 

OFFICERS 

Kathleen Allen President 

Hazel Leary. Secretarij 

Dorothy Ptnd _ Libnnidii 




MEMBERS 



Andrews, Kt'liccra 
AiKli'fWs. ;M;iri<»ii 
K;ilk. L<.uise 
Bell. Thelma 
Beiiiiptt, Eliiora 
Brown. Mary 
Culpepper, Marjraret 
Culpepper. I^Ieryl 
Davis. Katherine 
nicks. Louise 
Kilwards, Jlarv 
K^iliert, Nellie" 
Etheredpre. Grace 
Frederick. Helen 
<;reeii. Christine 
llralh. Marv 
Hill. Caroline 
.lackstfn, Marguerite 
.lones, Blanche 
Jiirdan. Katherine 
Kelly. Luis 
Kiii^. Mar^rie 
Kr4'ps, Elizabeth 
Lauiiston. Annie Lee 
I-e;iry, Marie 
Jiester. Khirence 
Leslcr. Martha 
Mathews, Mary 
Merry. Natalie 
.Meyer, Lucile 



McE wen . O la d y s 
^McHaniels, Evelyn 
Miller. Eulalie 
M u rra h. Ma r ^a ret 
North. Isaltelle 
Oliver, Louise 
Oliver, pjlizabeth 
()tis. Elizabeth 
Peterson. Li)uise 
Ponds, Dorothy 
Ponds, Laurie 
Keab. Laura 
Scha uf ele. Ma xine 
Scrufrjrs. Louise 
Spauldinff, Rose 
Stee.l. L(ds 
Sylvester. l>oraselle 
ThunipsKii. Alberta 
Tln)nipS'>n, Adelaide 
T.H.le. Naomi 
Twi;;us, Kathrvn 
Wall. Ida 
Wall. Mar^i-aret 
Warner, Elizalielh 
\\'eeks. Ja.vnn* 
Weiii:le, Kiitc 
Wells. Grayson 
Williams. Flo rim el 
Wiir^ins : Katherine 
Woodbury. FraTices 



OFFICERS 

Jaxie Tommins President 

Blanche Lehmanx Vice-President 

Margaret Johnson Secret an/ 

jMarv Mathenv Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Andrews. Rel)ecca Diliiii, .Mal'Karft .MiKire. Sara 

Anilrews, .MariaTi K^lifrt, Nellie MiMire, Di.rdtliy 

Baker. Cecilia Evans, Helen Norrell Frani-es 

Bennett. Elnura Hill, Elizabeth I'liwell.' Analiel 

Briscoe. Mar.v Hill. Martha Kevncil'ils. Sarah Belle 

Cartleilfje. Alice Hcilman. Jlarcella Weeks. .Ta.vnie 

1)111111. Henrietta Lester. Florence A\'all. Ida 
I^ester. Martha 

3limtnx* (UUtb 

OFFICERS 

Minnie Tommins President 

(iEUTiuDE GoETC-Hir.s V ice-Presidcnt 

Wii.mina Rowland Secret artj 

(iRACE Seales Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Armstrong, Mar.v McEwen. Helen Warner, Elizabeth 

Howard. Laiighoriie I'ower. .Ma.v Belle Weigle, Kate Louise 

Tiiiley. .Mar.v 




j<,xOvfc.k.i TR-APPIC HINDRANCE '. R-AY5 °' -^"^ bt.TTING SUt^ ^i 



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+ + 

OFFICERS 

Florence Lester _ President 

Bessie Rosenblatt Secretary 

Margaret Wall Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Faculty 
Miss Louise Cliiles Miss Anne Garrett Smith 

Miss Nancy Haddock Miss Louise Parks 

SENIORS 

Grace Etheredge Florence Lester 

Dorothy Moore Bessie Rosenlilatt 

JUNIORS 

Mary Anna Kahrs Mary Morris 

Helen McEwen Margaret Wall 

SOPHOMORES 

D.irothy Rell Alice Sunniiers 

FRESHMEN 

Hutli Dye Louise Oliver 

Langhorne Howard Rebecca Serotta 

Doris Langley 

SUB-FRESHMEN 

Molly Grusin I.uis Van Pelt 

Lucile Trowbridge Dora Havird 

Jewel Lewis Ann Barrett 







muvms 



>mmt QUasB lay 



+ + 




N THE fall of 1919 the class of 192;3 entered the gates of Tubnuui for 
the purpose of getting an education. At the beginning of our course 
of study we set out with one hundred and forty-seven girls. Some of 
our class mates have remained behind on account of illness, some have 
taken themselves to other parts, and some have entered the fields of 
matrimony. But, we who are going out into the world this year from 
Tubman are taking with us knowledge, experience, and ambition. We leave 
our building behind us, but we are taking with us the Tubman spirit which 
has prevailed over its girls for vears. 

When we were Freshmen (Ah, but it is worth all the years of hard study 
to be able to say that!), many important changes took place in Tubman. A 
new class was added and the girls that came to make up this class took some 
of the hazing that is usually meted out to the Freshmen. During that year, 
our class was highly instrumental in creating the "Honor League" and the 
"Athletic Association," two of the most beneficial and progressive steps taken 
by Tubman in a great many years. Best of all, the student body elected 
a staff' and published the first issue of this booklet you are now reading, 
MAIDS AND A MAN, (It will be noticed that a girl cannot keej) her thoughts 
long from such a subject as man!) 

When we became the wise young fools of Tubman, we found among the 
new teachers one who s])ccialized in bobbed hair, red tanis, and dcej) breath- 
ing exercises. The outstanding memories of that year are the I>yceum course 
and the May Festival. The Lyceum course, which was interesting, and en- 
tertaining, enabled us to get out of two classes a month. But it cost each 
of us two dollars! The May Festival was beautiful but oh, dear! how soon 
the pa])er costumes of the human flowers wilted in the downpour that in- 
terrupted the festival! 



In some way we weathered the "storms" of the Sophomore year and en- 
tered into the Junior class in 1921. We entered into the "gym" exhibition 
with nuich enthusiasm and took off the mimetic exercises with no little success. 
Soon after this our class made its debut and entered society. The College 
Club entertained us with a delightful little skit showing the value of a college 
education. Speaking of social affairs it would never do to overlook the fact 



that Sara .Moiiru won in the .Junior walkinij' ciinti'st, and upon mturing' thi' 
school contest, with jn-oud and frraccfiii carriage snnply walked of^' witii the 
candy. 

A large number of our chiss. after working- for months, finally ended u]) 
in the presentation of a ])lay, "The Yokoliama Maid," in which we showed that 
our class contained several of the greatest actresses of the future and a 
world of material for a musical comedy chorus. 

Our Senior year was just one social affair after another and on toji of 
these just one hard lesson after another. We attended the Robert E. Lee 
celebration given by the V. D. C.'s, and were overjoyed to find present our 
"brother" school, the A. R. C\ Our basket ball team won the class chamijion- 
ship, and the Varsity S(juad was largely made up of Seniors. And speaking 
of that \"arsity Squad — why it's the best Tubman has ever produced. They 
have won numberless laurels for Tubman this year. Two of the happiest and 
most enjoyable events of the Senior year were the Rotary and Kiwanis lun- 
cheons. You never know how much "])ep" our citizens have until you see them 
trying to make a good im])ression on school girls. 

Leaxing the bright and humoi-oiis side of our school life, we find that ours 
is a wondeiful class. On our roster are found names of girls who have re- 
presented 'J'ubman in every branch of school activity. \Ve have come, we 
have striven, and we ha\e captured — a dij)loma ! As we go out from Tubman 
after four years of work and hap])iness, may our class motto, "To be, not to 
seem; to do, not to dream!" help us throughout the coming years. 

— Frances Walton '23 



k,^— 6-';a — €i^— e 



'^-^^ 




ICaBt lltU dXih Sristamntt 



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K, THE Sfiiior Class of Tubiiuiii High School, City of Augusta, 
County of Richmond, State of Georgia, being of sound and disposing 
minds, and realizing the nearness of dissolution, do make, declare, 

l, M >^- and publish this instrument as our last Will and Testament, hereby 

||^*S^| revoking all other wills heretofore made by us. 

We, the class of 1S)2."5, hei'eby Ijecjueatli to the Class of lO'i-l, our (juiet 
diffnitv, our brilliant minds, our charniina' nianncr. and any other desirable 
traits of character. 

To Helen .MacMurphy, Ethel Miller leaves her talkative disposition. 

"Teto" Baker hecjueaths the dirt in her white sweater to Eleanor Morris. 

To any chemistiv student, Elma Keener leaves her aptitude for asking 
brilliant ijuestions. 

Frances Walton leaves to Dorothy I'unil her wonderful chiss spirit, hoping 
that Dorothy will attend all class iiK'i'tings and games during her Senior year. 

To Myra Hilton, Helen Probyn leaves her zeal for study. 

To Mary Plumb, Doris Speth leaves her coquetti.shness. 

Rosa Delle Evans bequeaths her socks to a Sub-Freshman, who will pri)l)ai)lv 
have more use for them. 

To Mary Morris, Ruth Johnson leaves her stentorian voice and l)oisterous 
manner, hoping that said legatee's soft voice and modest laugh may he im- 
proved. 

Janie Tomniins leaves to Alice Peebles her ai-gumeiitati\e powers. 

To Eunice Sawilowsky, Frances Conner l)e(|ueaths her romantic disposi- 
tion. 

Gussie Grusin becjueatiis to Sadie Xewhali her sylph-like form, ho])ing that 
Sadie will reduce. 

Wynelle Otwell leaves to Elizabeth Hill her luxurious curls, so that Eliza- 
beth will not ha\e to use curling irons in the futuri'. 

To Emily Hrooks, Anabel Powell hccjueaths her business ability. 

Frances AVoodbury becjueaths to Lucilc Meyer her graceful flancing, with 
the hope that Lucile may be greatly improved by said gift. 



To Louise Balk, Louise Smith leaves iier petite daintiness. 

Minnie C'oiien leaves to Sara Helle Itevnolds her desire to go to Savannah, 
iiojjing that Sara Belle will reaeh that lieautiful city in the near future. 

To Ruth Hardin, Henrietta Dunn l)e(]ueaths her wit and hiunor. 

Sara Moore leaves her "earnest" interest in everything to Annie Mae 
Lawrence. 

To Larry Wilder, Alice Danforth, a!id all the girls who spend the sixth 
period in the hospital room, Kathrvn Twiggs be(|ueaths her good health. 

Bessie Rosenblatt leaves to Tumpsie Boyce her excessive use of cosmetics, 
ho])ing that Tumpsie may be improved by ajjjjlication of same. 

To Addie Munday, Sarah Wvly leases her (|uick movements and nervous 
temperament. 

Senior B. leaves to Junior B. the back desks in Room 2;}, so that said class 
will not have the unnecessary trouble of going to the cloak room every morning. 

To Elizabeth Crenshaw, Janelle Gibbs becjueaths her history note book, 
thereby saving Elizabeth much imnecessary trouble. 

Nellie Holden be(jueatlis to Martha Criswell lu'r studious habits. 



Senior C". leaves to 



,Jui 



tl 



le nrivne 



ge of going to the lunch room 



the fourth period and telling AL's. I'arks that Miss ("omev wishes two slices 
of toast and a cu]) of tea for lunch. 

Thelma Seigler leaves to Dovie Wicker her skill in giving an oral composi- 
tion, provided it be poetry. 

Minnie Kreisberg becjueaths her voice to Lillian Hogan, if she will ])romise 
not to s})eak so low that she cannot be heard at a distance of one hundred yards. 

To Isolene Boyd, Carrie Ford becjui'aths her exemption marks in all sub- 
jects, especially in English and History. 

Senior A. leaves to Junior A. their well-known, (juiet and gentle manners. 

To the biology class of 1924, the class of 1923 bequeaths their attention 
and good behavior. 

ELIZABETH BIRDELL 

Testator 
Witnesses : 

FRANCES WALTON 
CE( ILIA BAKER 
JANELLE (JIBBS. 



(EksB frnpli^g 




AUAME, AREN'T vou 



from Augusta, Georgia? 
Weren't you graduated from Tubman in 192.'5? Well, 
maybe tliis will interest vou. Here's something bv Mr. 
T. H. Garrett, once Princijial of vour scliool." 

Madame, known to lier classmate.s as Elizabeth Bur- 
dell, waits to hear no more, but grabs the jtajjer and eagerly 
scans the column. She calls her husband, the Earl of Montmo- 
renci, from the next room and begins to read to him: 

"Mr. T. Harry Garrett, on a milk-white horse and per- 

retii'ed Principal of the Tub- formed marvelous feats. She, 

man High School, wishes to mv gentle readers, was none 

jjublish to the world the record other than Miss EInora Ben- 

of the most unusual class ever nett, another member of this 

graduated from this school dur- same gifted but peculiar class. 



ing his lengthy administration 
as l'rincii)al. 

"The public will be interested 
to know that Madame Kero- 
sene, who set the world on fire 
with her voice, was known at 
school as Kathleen Allen. She 
led the roll of the gi-aduates of 

'2;3. 

"Miss t'ecilia Bakei-, who al- 



"The Countess of Montmo- 
rcTici, formerly Elizabeth Bur- 
dell, is now s|)ending some time 
in Switzerland with her hus- 
band, the Earl of Montmorenci. 

"A woman lawyer occuying 
great space in the news])apcrs 
these days is Miss Minnie 
Cohen. I am glad to say that 
this worthy young lady has fol- 
lowed a natural course, as she 



ways dreaded getting fat, and ^,^^.^^,^ ^j;,, ,^,.^.^,^, ^^^ Tubman. 



who did her best to get Skinny 
while in school, has at last suc- 
ceeded. She has |)ublished a 
book called "How I Got 
Skinny." Every Tubman girl 
has read that book. 



"The successor of McManus, 
the comic artist, goes under a 
man's name for convention's 
sake, but is really Frances Con- 
ner. She is making enormous 
sums of money I hear, as much 
"Those who attended the as .$.'5, 000 a week. As her jokes 
circus last week doubtless recall are so natural, it is thought 
the fearless bareback rider who, that they come from real ex- 
clad in pink tights, dashed out perience. 



:^ 



\l 1* 



"^liss Katlicrine Davis has 
followed the lure of the stage, 
and is now one of Ziegfield's 
most prized chorus girls. 

"A fair member of this class 
who is making hers a useful 
life, is Miss Henrietta Dunn. 
She is teaching "Parlcz-vous 
francais" to the natives of New 
Zealand, and it is reported that 
they take to that language as 
ducks take to water. Henrietta 
knew French as early as '23. 

"The projirietors of the most 
])atronized garage in Augusta 
are Louise Dicks and Marceila 
Holnian. They demolish so 
many cars in wrecks, that they 
consider it more economical to 
do their own repairing. 

"It is rumored that Miss 
Margaret Dunn is the founder 
of, and chief contributor to the 
Home for Disabled Cats. She 
is doing great things in her 
humanitarian work. She sells 
gorgeous coats made from all 
"casualties" coming from the 
hospital. 

"It was hard to trace Nellie 
Egbert, Fannie Sandler, Anabel 
Powell, and Sarah Wyly, but 
after much search they were 
found in the heart of Africa. 
Nellie and Fannie arc raising 
])eanuts for the Monkey farm of 
which Anabel is ])ro|)rietor. 
Sarah is close by teaching the 
monkeys the value of slow ])ro- 
nounciation. 

"Grace Etheredge is busily 



occu])icd drawing illustrations 
for Virginia Sevier's thrilling 
novels. While at Tubman 

Grace showed marked ability as 
an artist. Virginia has ])ro- 
duced several best sellers which 
are read throughout the coun- 
try. 

"Delle Evans is famous as an 
actress in children's parts. I 
cannot understand her choice of 
a career, unless it is because 
she can still wear socks. 

"Carrie Ford has startled the 
world with her interpretation of 
the Ancient Egyptian dances. 
This is no surprise as Miss 
Ford always liked to dance. 

"It will be n surprise to many 
to know that the Czarina of 
Austria, who only last week 
honored our city with a visit, 
was before her marriage ]\Iiss 
Ola Franklin of Augusta. She 
received her dijilonia from Tub- 
man in 192.3. It is hard to 
imagine Ola bowing and scrap- 
ing to anybody, even to the 
])eople of Augusta. 

"Mary Willie Fulcher and 
Arbel Panknin are proprietors 
of the select "Fulcher and 
Panknin ]\Iodiste Shop" which 
carries the very latest things. 

"A very successful member of 
this class is Rose Funk, English 
])rofess()r in a large I'niversity. 
She made a special study of 
English at Wesleyan College. 

"Gladys Gary has recently 
become one of the efficient 



teachers of Jolin Milledgu, and 
Janellc Gibbs is the most effi- 
cient Princi])al Blythe School 
has ever iiad. It seems very 
strange tliat siie iiasn't had pity 
en George before now. 

"Gussie Grusin, Hke Doris 
Speth, is the owner of a stand 
on Broad. Gussie sells ]3op- 
corn, wliile Doris sells hot dogs. 
Gussie says the business is very 
])rofitablc. 

"Mary Heath is now at home 
on a furlougli, after ha\ing 
spent several years in Africa 
as a missionary to the savages. 
She brought back with her a 
luxuriant jjair of eyebrows ac- 
quired by the troj^ical heat. 

"Martha Hill, after four de- 
lightful years at Sargent, is 
now the competent gym teacher 
of North Augusta High School. 
She has achieved her highest 
ambition, that of being a Sar- 
gent graduate. 

"After working for a while 
as bookeeper, Nellie Holden 
married a dashing young army 
officer. She nmst he happy, for 
now she will not have to worry 
about notes and trial l)alances. 

"Bernice Hutchcson and 
Ruth Johnson are both leading 
thrilling li\es. Bernice is a 
great ai'tist, and is li\ing the 
care-free and gay Bohemian 
life in New York. Ruth is the 
young aviatrix who has out- 
rivaled Mabel Cody with her 
daring "nose dives" and "tail 
spins." 



"Mary K. Jones is sponsor- 
ing a woi-tliy cause by being 
president of a societv formed 
for the suppi'ession of Ijatin 
"])onies." 

"The na]iie of Sarah Jordan 
is on every tongue, for she has 
passed through Augusta and 
given one of her masterful (jra- 
tions which are said to outrank 
("iceroVs in literai'v \alue. 

"Elma Keener is Superinten- 
dent of Nurses at the Fniver- 
sity Hos])ital. She was ])ro- 
moted to this position because it 
did not require her |)resence in 
tl:e ojjerating room, an ordeal 
to which Elma always suc- 
cumbed because it reminded her 
so nuich of chemistry lab. 

"Innneiliately after gradua- 
tion, Minnie Kreisberg visited 
every state in the Fnion, and 
finally met her future husband 
in New York. They will visit 
the ])rincipal countrii's of Eu- 
rope on theii' honeymoon. 

"Blanche Lchmann, who is 
now known as the illustrious 
]\Irs. Irish, is predicting the for- 
tunes of the whole world for the 
next two centuries. The words 
"Irish" and "fortunes" will 
bi'ing memories of Tubman 
days to all of her friends and 
memories of Blanche also. 

"Florence Lester's ambition 
materialized. She married "the 
rich old man with one foot in 
the grave" and the other one 
on a banana ])eel, but he is now 



']} 



enjoying a hale and hearty old 
age. 

"A graduate of this class of 
whom little is heard, but who 
ranks iiigh in the hearts of iier 
fellow-citizens is Mary Ma- 
tlieny. It will be remembered 
that Mary rilled the reservoir 
with small fish to eat the germs 
from the city water supply. 
Her helper in all matters is 
Bessie Rosenblatt. They have 
done great things for their city, 
and greater things are expect- 
ed. 

"Milbra McGahee is the 
founder of a home for the in- 
sane. No patients are taken 
except those who have lost their 
minds because of worry over 
Profit and Loss Statements. 
She was always kindhearted, 
and evidently she remembers 
her own experience. 

"Ethel Miller, who is also 
helping unfortunates, is a most 
indispensable teacher in a deaf 
and dumb school. And she 
was considered so talkative in 
school ! 

"Ethel Montgomery is the 
efficient secretary of our ])re- 
sent mayor. She is famed the 
world over for her accuracy 
and s])ee(l. It is believed that 
she will be a great politician 
yet. 

"The extremely fashionable 
young widow of whom so much 
is heard, and who is so popular 
with the vounger crowd was, 
before her marriage, Dorothv 
Moore. 



"Another member of this 
chiss who lias won fame in the 
eyes of the world is Miss Sara 
Moore. She is touring the 
country giving lectures, her 
theme being "Have a good time 
while you are young." It i.s 
said that she practices what she 
])reaches. 

"Margaret Muri)hy is a 
comj)oser of sacred nmsic which 
is loved by all for its haunting 
sweetness. She gave promise 
of this talent while at Tubman. 

"After completing six months 
of her four years' course at the 
I'niversity of Georgia, Wynelle 
Otwell met her fate and settled 
down to calm domesticity, even 
though she had planned to 
studv for an A. B. degree and 
afterwards to teach English. 

"Louise Plumb followed 
Wynelle's exam])le by marrying 
the boy who occupied so nuicli 
of her time in history class. 
He is a diligent, hard-working 
farmer, and the one about whom 
Miss Flisch (juestioned her. 
But imagine her among the 
cows and chickens I 

"Effic Plunkett's well-known 
x'oice is heard on the \'ictrola 
in Fi-ench classes all over the 
I'nited States, so we see her 
chatter has not yet ceased. 

"Helena Prohyniss, the dar- 
ing tight-ro|)e walked of B. F. 
Keith's \'aude\ille is no other 
than Helen Probyn. This is 
another sur])rise, for she had 



|)]aniu'(l to finish at Wollesley. 

"\Vitli thf fxcoption of two 
voiirs, Tlieliiui Sei^ior lias been 
at Tubman ever since gradua- 
tion. Don't think slie iiad to 
.stay there! She took a course 
in Domestic Art, and is now the 
most efficient teaciier of that 
subject that Tuf)man has ever 
liad. 

"Tiie 'Advice to the Lovelorn' 
in tlie Augusta Herald is given 
by no other than Louise Smith. 
She must have had some experi- 
ence to have such an abundance 
of advice to bestow. 

"Tile mystery of tiie Hot 
Dog .stand on lower Broad is 
easily explained. Tiie very 
pretty and cute proprietress, 
before she changed her name, 
was Dori.s Spetli. In her 
searcii for romance, siie married 
a young "Dago", but now, after 
only four years of married life, 
the wife is running the Hot Dog 
stand and hubby takes life easy. 

"Grace Strauss occupies 
Miss Dora's ])osition as Latin 
teacher at Tubman, since the 
schedule now takes all of Miss 
Dora's time. 

"Essie Tant, a hard working 
member of this class, is leading 
a research party down in 
Egypt looking for records of 
the "Middle Ages." It is 
tiiought that she is desirous of 
learning how they ditl when they 
were "Middle Aged." 

"Wilhelmina Theiling married 
her employer, a handsome 



young doctor, after working foi- 
him only three weeks. She cer- 
tiiinlv knows liow to capture 
them in a short while. 

"Fannie Walton lias made a 
fortune with a reducing ma- 
chine, and says that siie is going 
to use it on herself as soon as 
she has time. Slie always 
dreaded getting fat. 

"Jayme Weeks made her de- 
but on the concert stage, and 
has been proclaimed Pade- 
rewski's equal. It is rumored 
that slie is coming here next 
week. 

"Florence Edith Wescoat, 
who always loved gay society, is 
at present cruising the Mediter- 
ranean on the yacht of the Van- 
derluth's. 

"Gossip Clubs, organized in 
several towns by Miss Frances 
Woodbury, have been votefl a 
great success. The reason they 
are so successful is because their 
organizer had so much ))ractice 
in her school days. 

"Mary I'etrea, Edna Strjiuss, 
and Janie Tonimins mysterious- 
ly disappeared immediately 
after the Class Day exercises 
and have never returned. 

"There was some trouble in 
obtaining this story from Mr. 
Garrett, but, after much })er- 
suasion, he kindly consented, 
and we have printed it just as 
he gave it to us." 

MARY PETREA 
EDNA STRAISS 
JANIE TOMMINS. 



lEx^mpttnns 



+ + 



Delle Evans 
Janelle Gibbs 



SENIORS 

Helen Probyn 
Edna Strauss 



Grace Strauss 
Florence Wescoat 



Marion Andrews 
Louise Balk 
Mary Briscoe 



JUNIORS 

Ruth Hardin 
Ivy Hixson 
Dorothy Levy 
Margaref Lockhart 
Mattie Mae Morris 



Katherine Schumacher 
Sarah Tanenliauni 
Lucile Whitlock 



Reliecca Andrews 
Ida Bothwell 
Catherine Branch 
Eleanor Brown 
Ida Grossman 



SOPHOMORES 

lyucy Goodrich Henry 
Martha Lester 
Gladys Miller 
Isabelle North 
Susie Quinn 
Alice Summers 



Belle Sawilowsky 
MarfTucrite Wescoat 
Mary Woodall 
Katherine Wiggins 
Ida Wall 



Vera Cars well 
Vaughan Corley 
Clennnie Downing 
Mary Fiske 
Virginia Fleming 
Mildrid Garrett 



Elizabeth Akennan 



FRESHMEN 

Langborne Howard 
Elizabeth Jones 
Lillian Kelly 
Lois Kelly 
Jaunita Luckey 
Evelyn McDaniei 
Mera Neary 
Wilmina Rowland 



SUB-FRESHMEN 

Georgia Brawner 
Blanche Kuhlkc 
Virginia Stuart 
Paula \'ogelsang 



Voncile Rogers 
Heline Schneider 
Estelle Sawilowsky 
Bessie Skinner 
Minnie Tanebaum 
Minnie Toniniins 



Marv I'oole 



J 



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And tlid' tlif winds of life hlow stronfr, 
Its sliMider fiirni will lie 
A graceful livinf; nieniorial 
Of the t'lass cif 'i'wenty-Tliree. 

We meet on tills day of days 

To plant a poplar tree; 

We hope it will ever stand 

To you as a memory. 

Fellow students, pray heed the call, 

Joyful and pay, 

On Arhor Day. 

Fellow students, pray lieed the call ; 

Each year plant a ])i>])lar tree. 

iuntnr Arbnr iair 

A day our class will lonf; rcmemlier. 
Was Arbor Day in last December. 
To leave at school some good impression. 
We lined ourselves in long procession 
With yellow caps and middies white. 
Indeed, we made a pretty sifrht. 
Though wading through a nniddy sea. 
We |>laced our dirt around the tree; 
'I'hen sang onr songs and said our speech. 
In all, the program was a "])cach." 
A picture wc will long rememlicr 
Was Arbor Day in last December. 

— Dorollii) I 'nil 1 1 




mm npu 0f ti?? fiattiH 



+ + 



UST THE iiioi'u TiR'iitioii ot this iiopulur vouiig iiiovic 
actress hrou^-lit a ])iic'kc'(l house to witness our vic- 
torious basket ball g'aiiu' with Atlanta and the charm- 
ing vaudeville afterwards. 

The ])lot of the story was one of those thrilliny; and 
exhilerating dime-novel stories dealing with the ])ure and simple 
love affair of a western cow-girl which was sadly broken up by 
a heartless vampire. Nfot a dry eye could be seen throughout 
the entire audience when the daintv little miss took sweet leave 




of life after her lover proved untrue. 

in this gri))]5ing novel were 



Those who supported Wild N'el 
as follows : 

Wild Nell ...Mary Plumb 

Handsome Harry Emma Phtnlett 

The Vamp Addie Munddji 

Pianist and Censors ..Culley, Hilton, Fuller 

Indians Cohen, Ponds. Fort son, Ahwonder 

Just before the l)lay, a number of popular selections were 
rendered by the Hobo orchestra under the leadership of INIarv 
Morris. Following this were several musical and dancing num- 
bers in which Misses Meyer, ("renshaw, Preachei-, I'und, Allen, 
and Mori'is took ])art. 

— Dorofiii/ I'nnd \'i\ 





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TWO WINNERS OF FIRST PLACE ON FIELD DAY 



oId a. a. (E. 

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111 a liandsoiiie building, old iiiid fine. 
With stiitely trees around, 
Are found the boys of A. R. C. 
With halos of honor crowned. 

They study hard and play liard, too, 
For football has its place, 
And basket-ball and iiuich iiard drill. 
And running from base to base. 

Glee Clubs have they for all who sing. 
And "zeros" for those that fail. 
And "A's" and "B's" for those tiiat work- 
Hut hark ! I hear a wail! 

'Tis someone on the flunkers' road ; 
He must have failed in French, 
Or Science, History, English or Math, 
Or lack of common sense. 

But one fiiuls manv unlike this |)oor bov 
In the classes of twenty-three. 
So let's give a cheer for one and all. 
The bovs of the A. R. C. 



-Ivy Hixsoii '2Jf 




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Atljbttr (Unitnril 

Miss IvEV - Physical Director 

Miss Plunkett Assistant Physical Director 

Cecilia Baker President 

Frances Fuller Secretary 

Dorothy Pund Business Manager and Treasurer 

Miss Hamilton. Faculty Representative 

Blanche Lehmann Senior Representative 

]\Iahv Mercer Jackson Junior Representative 

(tektkude Be ale Sophomore Representative 

Dorothy Dicks Freshman Representative 

Blanche Kthlke Sub-Freshman Representative 

Mr. T. H. Garrett Principal-Ejc-officio Member 

Elizabeth Mohley Captain Varsity Team 

Mary Edwards Elizabeth Kreps 

Cheer Leaders 



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El.l/.AHKIH Mo 1! LEY Cdpfn'tll 

DoKoTii V Prxi) Business Manager 

FORWARDS 

Oliver Scliiieidcr 

Sawilowskv Heath 

I'robyn 

CENTERS 
Strauss, G. Suimncrs Hill, M. 

GUARDS 
Baker Matheny Moblev 




m^ 






+ + 

Helen Probyn Captain 

FORWARDS 

Probvii Heath Weeks (sub) 

CENTERS 

Strauss, G. Hill, M. 

Fi-ankliii, (svih) Saiulk'f, (suh) 






GUARDS 


Baker 


Matheny (sub) 


Moblev 


Strauss, E. (sub) 



3lunt0r ©Fam 



+ + 



Mary Mercer Jackson Cti ntdiii 



FORWARDS 
Oliver Sawilowskv 



CENTERS 
Peebles Noriis Rosenthal (.sub) 

GUARDS 
Jackson Balk (sub) 

Lee Hilton (sub) 



^npljnmor^ ®^am 



+ + 



Gertri'de Beale Captain 

FORWARDS 

Norrell Wiggins (sub) 



Fulk 



CENTERS 
Summers Buale 

Green (sub) Jolinson (sub) 

GUARDS 

Fell Hill, E. Wall, I. (sub) 



1/ • 



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Baui 



Ji 



'Mary Fi.etchkk , Captain 

FORWARDS 

Sc'luR'ick'i- Toniniins Sjiwilowskv (sub) 

CENTERS 
Ha good Howard 

GUARDS 

Thompson Fletclier 



|jg|ujJ>,2J 







^^^-'^ 





ullj? mtl Ulrn Jlunk^h 



+ + 



(With :ii)oli)frii's to Ki|>linf;'s "'I'ln' \'aiii|)irf") 



A jrirl tlii'i'e was and her French she diil fhink 

(Even as You and I!) 
And she was sorry she'd called it hunk, 
For deep in misery she was sunk 

(Even as You and I!) 

Oh, the years she wastes and the tears she wastes 
And the work of her head and hands 
Belong to the days when she did not know 
(And now she knows she never could know) 
And never could understand ! 

A fiirl there was, and her time she spent 

(Even as You and I!) 
Honor and faith were a sure intent, 
(And it was the best that the (irior jjirl meant) 
But a girl must follow her natural i)ent 

(Even as You and I!) 

Oh, the toil she lost and the lurve she lost 
And the excellent things she ])lanMcd 
Belong to her, for she did not know why 
(And now she knows she never knew why) 
And never could understand ! 

The girl knew the things slie had ]uit aside 

(Even as You and I!) 
Were the things that no one on tarth could liide, 
(But she felt at last she hadn't tried) 
So some of her lived, hut the most of her died, 

(Even as You and I !) 

And it isn't the sliame. and it isn't the blame, 
That stings like a white hot brand. 
It's coming to know that she never knew why, 
(Seeing at last she could never know why) 
And could never understand. 



-Franri'!! Woodhurji '23 



)m 



>t«fty Mall 




T WAS about ton o'clock. Tliu long deserted room 
occupied bv a few rows of dusty desks was a study 
hall, I was told. 

Suddenly I heard a buzzing sound: then whispers 
and shuffling of feet. The room was in an instant 
filled with noisy girls. The youthful teacher then a])i)eared 
and after making desperate threats and displaying a neat pile 
of yellow cards, succeeded in (juicting tlie crowd. She then 
called the many nanies listed on tlie roll. A score or more of 
iiands were seen madly waving in mid air. Some wanted to 
take tiie divine trij) to tiie library, or to the pencil sharpener. 
After these wants had been granted, dorines and combs were 
seen in full bloom, tiie dorines doing their ])art to improve the 
ruddy faces of the girls, and the combs trying hard to arrange 
the lovely tresses and coveted curls of tlie l)obbed haired 
lassies. 

When all of these tluties had been pi'rformed, they settled 
down for one half-hour of sup])osed hard study; instead the 
time was sj)ent in reading the Photoplay magazine, within 
whose treasured pages was the hidden stoi-y of Hodolph Valen- 
tino's or Wally Reid's latest success. 

— Helen Sit under a 'i?5 



+ + 

Little Jennie at lier studies 
Made a lirave atteiii]it 
Little Jennie learned her studies. 
And l)eeanie exempt. 

So while all the other girls were 
Study infi hard at nights, 
Jennie had a date or two and 
Took in all the sights. 

Envying Jennie's long week's rest, 
All the girls did ery; 
"We'll he exeni])t this coming term 
Tho' from hai"d work we die.'' 



—Diirollii) I'lnid '2/, 



Auinhtograjilmnf A'iFrat pn" 



+ + 




HERE IX this world juii I'f (looil lieavens but it's darlv in 
lu-re! My brotlier is certainly treating me roufili. Hello! wliat's 
this? Mercy! so much lijrlit liliiuls mi after lieinfi in that darii old 
jiocket all the time. Listen what m\ brother is saying, "Dear- 
heart, would you wear this little |iin as a toUen of my er— er 
love?" he hurst out. 

"()h-h-h-h .liinni} deai-, that's lo\'ely of you," eooeil my new mistress 
with a baby-stare at me. "It's a love! S. A. E. — isn't it?" as she jiinned 
nie on her blouse. "Thank you so nuich, Jinnny, dear. Of course I'll wear 
it for you." 

I paid no more attention to the conversation as it did not concern me. 

Some time after I had an awful fall. I couldn't imagine what had hap- 
pened when I heard "Maby," as I teasingly named my mistress, ejaculate, 
"Oh, there goes my dress fallen on the floor," and I knew immediately 
that I was being introduced for the first time to mi-lady's boudoir. 

"Jane," that soft liiiuid voice conuuanded of a somebody dressetl in black 
and white, "]iut that pin in my box with all the others." 

'I'hen I was unpinned and put into a little ivory and lilue velvet liox 
and to my astonisbnu-nt there were six otiicr pins of the same order as 
nu-. 

"Hullo, who are you?" ini)uired one of the six. 

"I'm an S. A. E. ])in," I proudly responded. "Who are you?" 

"Well," answered one, "I'm a t'lii Phi pin and I've been here for ever 
so long." 

"And, I'm a Siguia-Xu," rejoined anotlier. 

"I'm a Phi Delta Theta," "And I'm a Ka])pa Alpha," ";\nd I'm an 
Alpha Tau Omega," chorused the others. 

"Well," resumed the Chi Phi inn, "It seems to me that the lady has a 
great many fraternity pins- " 

"I've heard that one girl should wear only one boy's pin," interrupted 
Kappa Alpha. 

"So have we," cried all th<' others. 

"Then what in the world is 'Baby' doing with .-nvni jilns?" 

"It seems to me," wisely answered Al])ha Tau Omega, "that 'Baby' as 
S. A. E. truly calls her, is "stringing" my brother and the rest of your 
fellow's frat brothers." 

There was silence for a few minutes fm- we were all thinking of our 
brothers. 

Then "She is a flirt!" said Phi Delta Theta, judicially. 



"Oli-li-h," we all said, "liow awful!" and s))(ike ni) more of the subjeet 
that nifilit. 

'I'lie to)> beinjr off I could clearly hear the conversation that went on the 
next nifrht. With a panjr of joy, I heard the prim voice of the black and 
white clad j)erson say, "Mr. ,Iames Marshall is calling Miss I.ucy." 

How wonderful! perha]>s I should see my brother again! In my excite- 
ment I lost the next words of "Baby." 

Then in a few minutes she ordered, ".lane, please get my — Oh dear, 
what fraternity does Jinuny Marshall belong to? Heavens! I've for- 
gotten ! I believe, yes, I'm rather sure he's a Kappa Al])ba man. No ! 
That's Fred's. Oh yes, he's a Chi Phi. Jane, get my Chi Phi pin." 

Well of all things — saying my brother was a Chi Phi man when he 
is really an S. A. E. Horrors this is awful! This little 'Baby' is a flirt 
and doesn't even remember things ! 

"Jane," as the person in black and white was called, took out my new 
friend Chi Phi. 

For a long time there was silence in the room and then the door burst 
open and 'Baby' rushed in talking excitedly to Jane, "Disgusting! .liTniuy 
Marshall is a little fool !How was I to know what fraternity he belonged 
to? He's absurdly proud of his old S. A. E. pin. Got perfectly furious 
when he saw the Chi Phi pin! Oh darn, he was just about to propose too! 
Well, back you go to Mister James Marshall, you old S. A. E. pin!" she 
finished addressing me. 

If I had dared, I would have said, "Yes, 'Baby' and I'm glad of it!" 

Months of bliss passed while I was worn on my brother's coat. I went 
everywhere with him. Pretty girls lisped about me and subtly hinted but 
my brother wasn't to be fooled twice. 

Then one day we met Her ! I could see that my brother was crazy about 
her. The next day he took me into his confidence and said, "Dear 
old pal, I was fooled once by giving you to the wrong girl and I said 
'never again' but now, old pal, I'm going to ask the best little girl in the 
world to wear you for me and later on perhaps — " 

And tho' I was simply dying to hear the rest he stopped and looked at 
me for a long time and said nothing. 

The next night we went to see Her. After a few minutes light talk my 
brother took me off his coat and holding me in his hand said gravely, 
"Jeanne, I want to tell you a story." And he proceeded to tell her the 
same story he had told me only in very different words. After he 
finished he asked, "Now Jeane dear, will you wear my frat pin?" 

"Why, of course, I will, Jimmy dear. I should love to. "And" she 
added lightly "I'll take very good care of it !" 

And ever since she has worn me and — Hush ! — I'll tell you a secret. 
"Now she is engaged to my brother, Jimmy Mar.shall!!" 

— Marijnrel Johnson '2't 



mb-^ute" 



+ + 



(With apologies to James Wliitconili Hilej) 

Little Suli-sul) has Just come to our school to stay, 
An' study ever so hard, with never a minute for play, 
An' pet u]) early in the morn' and come to school all fresh, 
An' study music and English and do her very best. 
An" all us other students, when the study time is done. 
We pull her from her study room and "as the niostest fun 
A-Iist'nin" to examinations 'at Sub-sul) tells about 
An' the "Repeaters" 11 git you 
Ef you 
Don't 
Watch 
Out! 

Once there was a little Sub wouldn't get lier lesson. 
So when she got her card one day, waiting for a Itlessin' ? ? ? 
Her mammy made her holler and her daddy made her liawl 
An' when 'twas time for school next day, she couldn't be found at al 
They seeked her in the jiicture house, and in her favorite nooks 
But all they ever found was thist her Englisli and history books. 
She surely was a hidin'; of it there was no doulit. 
For the "Repeaters" '11 git you 
Ef you 
Don't 
Watch 
Out! 

An' Little Sulj-sub says, when spelling's very hard. 
An' History lesson harder and you're shown your monthly card. 
An' you hear the boys a callin' and the show is mighty fine 
An' to go to a dance once more, every one of you do pine — 
You better git your lessons right, and git things good and clear 
An' speak of teachers, not as mean, but as so very dear 
An' help the poor and shaky ones 'at cluster all about 
Or the "Repeaters" '11 git you 
Ef you 
Don't 
Watch 
Out! 

— Ivi) ilai/ Hi.vsoH '2^ 



A iFarulty Snmattr^ 



+ + 






0'- NCE rPOX a time thcTu was a little girl named "Eve" 
"Rutledge" in the little town of "Abernathy" on 
,■ "Odom" Street. Her house was surrounded by many 
"Parks" within which were many "Green" "Woods." 
"Eve" was very pale and "White" because she had 
stayed in the "Garrett" and read "Page" after "Page" of 
"Emersons" poems which she had learned to love at "Smith's." 
She was always very "Frank" and she lived in "Comfort" in 
her iionie. "Eve's" heart was "Pearce"d with pangs of love. 

One night "Hamilton" "Adams" a grandson of President 
"AVilson," from "Anderson," S. C. came to sec her and brought 
her a "Hursts" Sunday American, and a box of "Hollings- 
wortii's" best candy, and flowers from "Boatwright" 's Nur- 
sery. "Ham" took "Eve" to "Chiles" Restaurant and they 
ordered "Haddock" from the "Flisch" Market, and "Hains" 
dill ])icklcs. 

They decided to be married and so Preacher "Callaway" 
performed the ceremony with "Clark" "Null" as best man and 
Anne "Brady" "Owens" as maid of honor. They went to the 
little town of "Comey" and while driving through the sixth 
"Ward" were nearly arrested by Sheriff "Plunkett." They 
finally arrived at their destination and "Ham" bought a little 
home covered with "Ivey" vines on "Turner" Street and they 
lived happily ever after. 

— Dorothy Bell '^5 



Beaux and books, an odd duet, 

I'm sure you'll ajfree with me; 

But just think of hooks without any beaux, 

How dull would life then be ! 

When lessons are lonjr, and hard, and tirin;;, 
And of endless numbers, too; 
Without the thoujrht of Friday and Billy 
What in the world would you do/ 

When you've an "exam" for the very next day 
And you sit u|) late to "cram"; 
There's always the eonsolinfr thoufrht 
That tomorrow you mijrht see Sam. 

When lessons aren't learned, and teachers are cross 

And everythinfr's going wrong; 

Our thoughts go wildly wandering off, 

"Why are the days so long?" 

So though to some it may be a shock. 
And very unwise I suppose; 
"I'm here to confess" we could never endure 
(_)ur boitks without our beaux. 

— ifailflini- Green 



(Em f rara from Nnui 

+ + 

I am thinking to-day of a place far away. 

That I left in the days long ago. 
I am longing to hear the bell calling clear, 

Tubman ! I miss you so. 

Call me back school o'mine; 

Let me stay once again, 
On the ])lace that to me seems divine. 

Let me play on your courts. 
All the old Tubman sports 

As I did in the days long gone by. 
Let me roam through your halls, 

Let me run to the calls. 
Of the bells, as I did long ago 

How I wish I were back! 
With the rest of the "))ack" 

To my dear old Tubman, once more. 

—Doris Speth 'g3 



®I|t0 Junny Warlhl 



■i- + 




letters : 

inv life 



CAXXOT REALIZE tluit it is just five days since 
I read that note in History class. "Sam" ])assed it 
to me while "Uncle Dan" was putting an outline on 
the board. The envelope was addressed : " 'Betty' 
and 'Binnie' ", and in one corner was written in large 

"Be careful." That note was the biggest surprise of 

It read : 



'Meet me heiiind 
Tom and Kirk 



"I am iiaving a masquerade dance Friday night and you all 
have got to come. Now, don't say you can*t ! Be sure to 
wear cra/.y costumes. Tom and Kirk will come for you, of 
course, ril tell you more later. S. A. M." 

"Can you beat that.''" Betty whispered to me. I tore a 
piece of {)a])er from the back of my history book and scribbled 
on it: "Are you crazy.'' You know we can't come! How in 
the world could we get out of the dorm.'"' 

Ill a minute a note came back. It read: 
Science Hall after next class and find out. 
lia\e thought up a cute plan." 

Just then "uncle Dan" glanced toward me and, putting on 
the most intelligent look possible, I said, "Doctor Blocker, I 
didn't understand that last topic you were discussing." It 
worked ! Oft' he started to exjilaiii it all over again. I noticed 
he was watching me so I didn't dare write another note, al- 
though I was nearly dying of excitement. What in tjie world 
could be the jilan.'' 

Betty and I were waiting behind Science Hall when "Sam," 
followed by Tom and Kirk, appeared uj)on the scene and I 
know we asked at least ten questions in the first ten seconds. 
All the three proceeded to explain at once, and when we had 
heard the whole ])lan, we were not in the least convinced that it 
uas a good one. But Tom and Kirk were fully determined; 
tliiv argued until we finally had to give in. We agreed to try 
the ])lan. How could we be such "nuts.''" 



As soon as the bio; (juestion was settled, a less important 
one arose. Wliat could we do for costumes? I thoufj'ht and 
thought ; in geometry class, in French class, in chemistry class. 
I soon found out that Betty was thinking too. In chemistr^ 
class, Professor Smitli asked lier to give tlie j)hvsical j)ropertie^ 
of red phosphorous, and she said, "Why er— red phosphorous 

is black and cr ." Everybody burst out laughing and Betty 

looked around in bewilderment. She was thinking, but not ('f 
chemistry. Suddenly, I had an idea! 

Tliat afternoon we went to town and bought black cotton 
material and a can of wiiite paint. Five o'clock found us on 
the floor cutting, sewing,- painting, and fitting, with Jamie Eg- 
bert stationed outside tlie door to ward oft' any unnecessary 
visitors such as "Snoo])y," our matron. (We had let Jamie 
into the secret, because we had to have someone to act as police- 
man, to put our scheme over.) I was trying on one of our 
"Paris creations" when Jamie gave tiie danger signal, and in 
two seconds the "creation," the paint, the scraps, the scis.sors — 
everything was under tlie bed. 

When "Snoopy" entered tiie room, Jamie had disappeared 
and I was industriously writing a letter, while Betty was ap- 
parently reading a book. I saw a queer look come over 
"Snoopy's" face as slie entered the door. Slie started to sniff'. 
The paint! "It smells like paint in here," she said. ( ^ly 
knees began to shake.) 

Betty came to the rescue. "Yes'ni," she said, "I've noticed 
that on warm days the paint on the building gets sticky, and 
smells just like fresh ])aint." 

"Snoo))y" looked skeptical. "It is ])ossiblo," she said and 
left the room. I breathed again, for the first time in five 
minutes. 

Finally the costumes were finished. After "lights out" we 
tried them on, and, I declare, when I looked at Betty, a shiver 
ran up and down my spine. We had made them from the black 
material and on each had painted a white skeleton. In the 
dim light the eft'ect was awful ! 



We hid the costumes carefully and then went to bed. 
"Think of having a family skeleton in the closet," Betty whis- 
pered to me, just before I fell asleep. 

"Wait 'til to-morrow," I muttered sleepily. 

P'riday night after "lights out" we ])ut on our costumes, 
then tied two sheets together and fastened them to the bed- 
post near the window. Then we sat down to wait. Soon we 
heard a low whistle under our window. It was Tom and Kirk. 
We opened the window- and let the sheets fall out. I helj)ed 
Betty over the window ledge and .she started to slide down 
the sheets; but, suddenly, there was a ripping sound and Betty 
fell to the ground. My heart was in my mouth. Suppose 
she were hurt ! But she wasn't ; there she was getting up and 
beckoning me to hurry. Then it occurred to me how funny it 
really was. What had the boys thought when they saw this 
skeleton dangle from the window and then fall to the ground."* 
Jamie, who was there to help us, quickly tied out two bed- 
sjtreads together and I slid safely down them. As we slipped 
away across the campus, I saw Jamie pulling in the bed- 
spreads. Good 'ole Jamie ; she'd cover up our tracks ! 

Of the party I can say little except that I had a wonderful 
time, and that it was well worth the trouble and the conse- 
(|uences. But, oh! to be a town girl like "Jam": she didn't 
liave to sneak back into the "dorm." 

Kvervthing had run smoothlv so far. If we could get back 
in tlie "dorm" safely it would be a perfect lark. But our luck 
deserted us! Just as I was climbing through the hall window, 
we heard a noise. Betty was already inside, holding the screen 
up for me, when "bang!" the screen had fallen! "Oh! that 
noise scared me so. What shall we do.'' Someone is coming," 
gas])ed Betty in one breath. 

"Let's make a dash for our room," was all I could say. We 

rjin for the stairs, and there was "Sn()o])y" just coming down. 

"Who's down thei'e.'' Who's down there.''" she was calling. 
"If you don't tell nie I'll alarm the house." 

I would havi' laughed if I hadn't been so scared. When she 
saw us, she gave a stifled scream and stood rooted to the 



spot. "Slic tliinks wu art' gliosis," flaslicd through mv mind. 
I daslied riglit past her up the stairs, Betty following me. 
We hurried to our room as quietly as possible, and in less than 
two minutes we had thrown our costumes out the window to 
the boys and were "sleeping peacefully" in bed. 

It must have taken "Snoopy" five minutes to recover her 
senses, for it seemed like hours until we heard anv sounds. 
Then there were noises all over the "dorm" ; doors banged ; 
five or six voices cried, "What's the matter.?" and girls ran 
up and down the halls. 

"Let's go and see the excitement," I whispered to Betty. 
Just then Jamie pop])ed into the room with excitement sticking 
out all over her. 

"Oh, kids !°* she exclaimed, "you're in the worst fix. Oh! its 
awful but I just didn't know what to do!" 

"What's the matter.?" Betty and I exclaimed in chorus. 

"Well, you see," continued Jamie, "Snoopy came upstairs 
a few minutes ago and waked me uj) to ask where you were. She 
had evidently just been in your room. I didn't know what in 
the world to tell her, so I said the first thing that came into my 
head. I told her you were up in the attic telling ghost stories. 
Just then we heard that noise and she hurried down stairs. I 
knew it was you coming in and I nearly died ! Uid she see you?" 

Just then we saw "Snoo])y" coming down the hall with a 
mob of girls around hei-. I ran toward them, yelling, "Oh, 
Miss Cloudiii what was that awful noise.? I'm nearly scared 
to death!" 



"Be quiet, girls," she ordered, 
the dormitory." 



'\Ve will make 



a seurcli o 



We covei-ed every square inch of the first and second floors, 
but still "Snoopy" was not satisfied. "We must search the 
attic," she said. "Snoopy" went ahead to o]jcn the attic door, 
but — oh! horrors, it was locked. T^OC'KED ! and Jamie had 
tokl her that we were up there no less than fifteen minutes ago. 
"Snoopy" turned and looked at me, then at Betty. I thought 
her eyes would bore holes right through me. "Girls," she said, 



"vou niav go back to your rooms. It will not be necossarv to 
suiircli tiie attic. I locked tiie door a few days ago. Vera and 
Elizabeth, I would like to see you before classes tomorrow. You 
may go to your room." We fled ! 

"Oil, wiiat sliall we do.''" gasped Hetty in tlie safety of our 
i-ooin. "We'll be sliipped — you know we will! Why, tiiey'll 
know we were up to sometiiing and just leave it to "Snoopy" to 



find out wiiat. Oh! It makes 
away with a thing." 

"It's awful," I ifroaned. 



ad. We never can get 



ust drop])ing off to sleep, 
Binnie — I've got an idea ! 



About an hour later, wiieii I was 
Betty whispered, "Binnie, wake up 
Let's tell 'Snoopy' we got into the attic through the transom. 
It's possible, and wc just have to do something." 

"All riglit, let's ti'v it: it's our last eiiance," I replied. 

The next morning we iiad a long "conflab" witli "Snoopy." 
Finally slie tokl us that if we could give a demonstration of 
our entrance to the attic, she would be convinced that we had 
not been up to any worse mischief ; but that if we could not 
prove it, she would have to look into the matter. She ended 
her lecture by saying, "you are certainly unusual girls." 

Outside tjie dooi-, I wiiis])ere(l to Bettv, "unusual is luv middle 
name !" 

Fifteen minutes later, I was lialf wav through the transom, 
trying my best to scjuii'm througii, I gritted my teeth. "You've 
got to do it," I said to myself, "Snoopy is watching you." I 
gave one last squirm and it was done. "Snoopy" unlocked the 
door and let me out with a look of amazement on her face. 
"You are certainly unusual girls," she repeated. "It will not be 
necessary for Elizabeth to give a demonstration. I do not 
doubt that she is perfectly capable of doing it. \ow that you 
girls have ))roved to me that you were in the attic, I feel obliged 
lo atlminister a slight j)unishment. As you know, it is against 
rules for a young lady to be out of iier room after 'lights out' 
hell, and most unusual to be in the attic. The mildest pvuiish- 
ment I can give you is a week on campus." 



"A week's c'am])us," I inunmired. "Tliis is tlie blow that 
kills !" 

lyater that iiioriiiiifr in history class, I wrote a note to 
Tom. "I am cHm})use(l for a week for beiii^- in the attic last 
night. Isn't this a funny world?" 

A few minutes later a note came back. It read : 

"I am campused for being in your "dorm" last night, wearing 
a skeleton costume. They found us with the goods! Isn't this 
a funny world.''" 

Three more days of campus but no regret ! 

— Mary Briscoe ''2Jf 




Smttnr l^otm 



+ + 



THE LAST BUT ONE 

Our (lays at Tuliiiian now are few, 
"Our race is nearly run," 
In the words of our dear old English book 
We are "tlie last l)ut one." 

Though as I've said we're almost through, 

Days of study have just begun; 

There are Chemistry, French, and things much worse 

AVhen you're "the last but one'.' 

You learn the words you shouldn't use, 
And the things that aren't said or done; 
And we can't use "awful," "precious" or "ain't" 
For we're from "the last but one." 

We study Geometry, Latin, and French 
From dawn "til set of sun; 
And hold our lieads just a little bit higher. 
We girls of "tile last but one." 

And since we're all just "average girls." 
We've had our share of fun; 
Come on, here goes, we'll give a cheer 
For tlie class that's "last but one." 

— Mfiilfliiie (rreen '2j^ 



+ + 

One day while dozing in the sun 
With her hard lessons half undone, 
A Sophomore composed, in a dream, 
A very comjjlex Enjrlish theme. 
Into the theine, her books took lead 
And not 'til she 'woke were they freed. 

In the fore.st of Arden Caesar met Bonaparte 

And in the same place Rosalind captured his heart. 

She asked, "Comment allez-vous ma chere?" 

And he replied, "Veni, vldi, vici, my dear." 

"Buenos dias Senorita," said Joan of Arc; 

"Two minuses make a plus," whispered Mark. 

Algebra, Modern History, and French 
Were joined together without making sense; 
Spanish step])ed in and took )iart in the game, 
And changed its contents but kept its name; 
Later Latin and English peeped in the door 
And were C()ni|)elled to bow and take the floor. 

At last she awoke with a toss of her head 
And thought of the dream, which made her afraid 
That she did not understand her lessons at all. 
And that her niontlily mark to C+ would fall; 
So she made a resoluti(m to study each day 
And keep some of those flunking marks away. 

— Reherni .t itti relet 'ii'i 






Ollfp (Elaaa nf '2fi 

+ + 

We are the future Senior Class 

Of nineteen-twenty-six; 
Tliat is if we all dnn't "flunk," 

Or ffet into some other lix. 

Some |)eople think we're not worthy of note 

As if we were Suhs so green; 
I?ut you just wait — they'll finally .see, 

We're the finest they've ever seen. 

So here's to the class of twenty-six 

A very great numher are we; 
That is — we are at the present time — 

Whieh is nineteen-twenty-three. 

I guess, when our day finally comes, 
Our crew will he slifilitly diminished; 

But those that survive will proudly say, 
"You see- -at last we have finished. 

— Miiniif 'rtfrnmhis \'G 



QH}t iEnnntnug of ^rljnnl ICtfr 



+ + 




OKS THE daily routiiii' of scliool life ever grow tii'u- 
sonie to you? I am sure it does even tiiougli you don't 
like to admit it for fear that one of your teachers 
might hear it and "pick on" you, as I sometimes lieai- 
girls say, or perhaps "flunk" you for not taking in- 
terest in your work. 

How tired we all get of having to he at school everv morning 
at nine o'clock, rain or shine, and how wearisome it is to be 
compelled to sit in Assembly and listen to what seems to be the 
same list of announcements every morning! The only relief 
from this is to be tardy and sj)end the first ])eriod in the library, 
but that doesn't work so well when the end of the month 
comes and we sec our report cards. 

The day wears slowly away with a "bawling out" from 
the history teachei-, a "little" lesson in bookkeeping, and pro- 
bably a little scolding from the English teacher who wishes 
to keep up with the crowd. Einally the 2:10 bell rings out 
the joyful sound that school is dismissed. 

But our joy is soon killed, for after eating dinner we start to 
get our lessons for the next day. We even grow tired of our 
books and wish for a history book with a red cover instead of a 
blue one, or a shorthand book with a blue cover in place of the 
yellow one. We "dig" with all our might until eleven o'clock 
and go to bed wondering if tomorrow can [)ossibly bring anv- 
thing new. 

— Janelle Gibbs '23 



otlf^ Jnrngtttta 



+ + 



m !i 



I wander to-day in the {rarden of youth, 

And the world is fair to me, 

For I listen lonfr, 

To the Siren's sonp. 

And let all care begone. 

While my spirit roams joyous and free. 

Why should I worry, weep, fret or strive, 

For things of faraway 

When life's a flower. 

That blooms an hour. 

And then as in a shower, * 

It drops and falls at the close of day? 

So to all things there comes an end. 

Either hapjiv, triumphant, or sad, 

Save to one thing 

Which may bring. 

To a name, an eternal ring. 

And then if we strive, we'll be glad. 

For there's never an end to possibilities; 

No one knows what the future may hold; 

So ever 'tis best. 

To face the test. 

And our inner selves will do the rest. 

For whatever may be is never told. 

— Surah Rhlhhiinvrr '2^ 



The hig old clock chimed forth the hour, 
And all the world seemed still; 
The last small fire lijrht died away, 
And o'er me sent a chill. 

My mind had drifted far away. 
And not where it should he. 
Before my idle outspread book 
Of Ancient History. 

I wondered if the old time folks. 
Of ages long ago. 

Had to learn the why's and how's 
That made this old world go. 

I wondered if things really seemed 

As queer to them as me. 

For wars and dates and government scrapes 

Compose all history. 

I find it mighty hard to learn 
To concentrate my mind. 
And not go dreaming into space 
My heart's desire to find. 

So if in school I'm asked a war 
And get the answer wrong. 
It's not because I have no sense 
But dream as I go "long. 

— Dorufhi/ Puml '-24 



I'rof,--A fonl cjin Jisk iiHirn ii nest ions 
I hail a wisf innii i-mii iiiiswcr. 

StiidfUt— Tliiift> the n-iison wt- all 
rivinked. 

* * * 

Professor -"Whjit is a coinliirtor of 
t'ltM-tri<-it,v ■.'■' 

St luU'iit— "Whv-pr" 

I'roft'ssor"--Tiiaf s ri^ht 1 What is 
the unit of Hloctricity V 

Stiulpiit— "Tl.f what sir'.'" 

Professor — "(_>. K. Vt-ry jrood." 

* * * 

The national anthem of Sweden is not 
"Oh. Say. Can You Ski?" despite re- 
[Mprts to the contrary. 

* * * 

Susie — "Pai»a. what nnikes a man al- 
ways j^ive a woman a diamond eTi;;a!;i'- 
nn^nt rinjr V" 

Her Father— "TIh' WdUian." 

'■'riirtM- ha ir nets pU-asf.' 

•■Wlial slrt'n;ith V 

"Two dam-i's and a <-ar ride." 



"She j;avt' nif 
"Beam, eh '.■'■* 
"Nam — bored I* 



don look.*" 



"I'm off of women for life." said thi' 
shoe as the junk man idckod tiiin up. 

* * ^- 

She (ovor the telephone) — '•('ant you 
cnnio (Mil tonij::htV" 

Ho — "Why-er — I bavo an cx.ini ti>- 
ninrrow." 

She — "Von soe father stayed at I ho 
<luli. midher is at a hridjie party, ami 
l.rother " 

He "III drnp thr murse and see you 
in ten minntes." 

Senior — "Havt* yon ever read any nf 
Scott's novels V" 

Sub-Fresh— "Xi>. Itnt I've taken a lot 
nf his Kniulsion." 

* * -: 

She — "Hi) you know wliy I refused 
you ?" 

He^"Let's see. I can't think." 
She— "Kij-'ht." 

* * * 

Lady — "I am afraid. do<-tor, I am 
;:oins' to be compelled to '^o to a 
warmer climate." 

Doctor — "Take my medicine and don't 

•rive up hopes." 

« * * 

Bimbo- "Forsooth. <-hild. the ;:oldtish 
hath contractetl exzema." 

Baxo — "Of what inipcprf.' Tis linl (Oi 
a small scale." 

Headline : "Li.L'htnin;r Knocks .Man 
<»ut of Bed." We suppose he said, 
"All ri;,'ht. dear. I'll jret rijiht n)i." 

* * * 

1st Soph. — "(tiiinjr to that aiii>endix 
oiieration this afternoon ';" 

Jnd Soldi.— "No. 1 hale Hlosc or^-an 
recitals." 



I'rof.— "Wlio was the 
ventor'/" 

St u tie — "An Irishman 
Pendiui;." 



;rreatest in- 
named Pat 



Prof.— "Detiiie 'Trickle'." 
Frosli — "To run slowly." 
Prnf.^"I>eline 'Anecdote'." 
Frosh — "A short funny tale." 
Pn f. — "I'se both words in a sen- 
tence." 

Frosh — "The dot; trickled down the 
street with a can tied to his anecdote." 

* * - 

Miss Flisch— "KIma. where was the 
Oecla ration of Independence signed?" 

Klma— (After a moment of hesitatittn) 
"At the bottom." 

* • - 

Teaclier ■\\'ho was the tirst nnin*.'" 

Scholar "Washing-ton; he was the 
lirst in war. tirst in " 

Teacher — "No. no; Adam \\as the tirst 
nniiL." 

Si-holar "(Hi. if you re talking: of 
foreiy:ners. I s'liosi- he was. " 

Yale sluilent. reading;' Vir^^il — "Three 
(inies 1 strove to cast my arms alioul 
her neck and— that's as far as I ;:ol . 
pri>fessor. 

Pr.dVssor— "Well. Mr. Kvarts. 1 think 
llial was ijuite far enough." 

* * • 

The Bigger Family 

1. There was Mr. an<l Mrs. Bigver. 
and baby Bigger, now who was bigger':* 
Ans. — Baby was a little Bigger. 

J. Mr. and Mrs. Bigger and baby 
Bigger sat at a round taltle at break- 
fast, now who was bigger V Ans.— 
Baliy was l)y father Bigger. 

■'1. Baliy Bigger met with a sad a<'ci- 
dent and had his foot amputated, now 
who was liigger'.' Ans.- Baliv was one 
foot Idgger. 

4. Mr. Bigger died and Mrs. Bigger 
married his brother, now who wns 
Idgirer'.' Ans — ;\Irs. Bigger was twice 
bigger. 

.".. Baby Bigirer died, now who was 
bi-ger. Ans. — Baby was a little Idgger 

still. 

* * * 

The .M.iin Thing.— An old darkey got 
up one night at a revival ineetini; and 
sai<l : "Brudders an' sist<'rs. you knows 
and I knitws dat I ain't been what I 
orter been. Ise robbed henroosts an' 
stide hawgs, an' tole lies, an' got drunk, 
an' slashe<l ftdks wi' mah razor, an' 
shot crajis. an' cnssed an" swore; but 
1 thank the Lord der's one thing I ain't 
iiebber d(Hie. I aiiit nebber lost niv n-- 
ligion. " 

* • « 

The Literary Lid Is Off. — Some of our 
story writers are running riot with 
their similes. Here are a few we 
gathered in our late reading. 

"Her lips (luivered like a light auto." 

"He edged nearer to her until -k* was 
almost as close as the air in the sub- 
way." 

"But his mind. like her face, was 
made up." 

"Her hair drt.jpped on her pallid 
(dieek lik<' seaweed on a (dam." 

"lie gazed anxiously at her fa<*e. the 
way a person in a taxi gazes at the lace 
id" the meter." 



Why He Wanted It 

The lihrnrinu in ;i n-rluiTi SuiUh'-Tii 
city was iiii|)r<fncheil rtM-cnily Wy a large 
colored man with a j^reat deal of as- 
siiraiic-e. "If yitii please, nia'aiu. Ah'd 
like to jiet an eiu-yclnpaedia." he said 
handing;- her liis card. 

"Why, wiiat do yoii \v;iiit with an 
eneyduiciedia V" she askeil him. sur- 
i)rised at this mm sua I re<inest. 

"Well, ma'am," he explained, "us 
colored folks has orj;anized a literary 
'ciety and I'se on de pro;>ra,n for a 
pai)ah on "Current Kvents" an<[ Ah 
wanted to rea<l up a little." 

« * X 

Just a Little Wrong 

A certain idieniist advertised a [latent 
concoction lalpeled ; "No more culds I No 
more con;;h ! I'ri<'e hfty cents." 

A man who lmnj;ht the mixture came 
hack in three days to complain that he 
had drunk it all, I)ut was no better, 
"Drunk it all I" gasped the chemist. 
"Why, unm that was an india-rubber 
solution to put on the s(.des of your 
boots." 

* * •■ 

A peanut lounged on a railroad track. 
Its heart was all a flutter. 
The o :lo came down the track 
Tout ! toot : I'eaTiut butter. 

tp * i, 

No? 

Helen— "I don't think I ought to get 
zero on this test." 

Lucile— "1 don't either, but that is the 
lowest mark I <-aM think of." 

Marvin — "I'op, do you know the Latin 
for people?" 

Kather— "No, what is it V ' 

Marvin- -"rojiuli." 

Mother — "Marvin, Imw dare you call 
yuur father a liar." 

* * » 

In Lecture 
Teacher — "Wake that girl next to 
you, will you V" 

Pupil — "Do it yourself — you put her 

to sleep." 

* * * 

"I Ain't Got Xo Body," sang the head 
of Marie Antoinette as it rolled from 
under the guillotine. 

« * * 

Miss Flisi-li (in Economics Class) — 
"What is a silent nnijority V 

Absent-minded pmdl— "Kr. I guess 
it's two men wIihu lliere's :i wonnm pre- 
sent." 

In Miss Comey's English Class 
A cautious hpok around he stole. 
His b;igs of < hink he chunk ; 
And many a wicked smile he smoie. 
And many a wink he wunk. 



tiv 



"Liza, di 



Liiiiheienl day for 



"What race. I'ompey "/' 
"Why. de colored race, yon st ui'id 
nigga." 

"Samltn. did yon ever see the Catskill 
mountains'/ ' No sah, I've si-eii 'em kill 
mice." 



Which End? 

A judge, pointing with his cane t(» a 
jirisoner before him. renuu'ked : "There 
is a great rogue at the end of this 
stick." 

"At which end, your honor '.'" aske<I 
the ]iris(iner. 

* * * 

"JohiiTiie." said mamma to her little 
son, didn't I tell you not t<» eat that 
c:indy until after dinner?" 

Johnnie, who lisps: "I ain't e;ifing 
the candy. I'm mily lhu<ktng the 
juithe." 

* « « 

"Is this seat engaged miss?" aske<l 
a young swell of a bright looking 
uniiden on the train the other day. 

"No sir." she modestly replied, "itnt 
1 am." 

* * 

Soil Fresh : "Mr. (larrett. is it true 
thiit seven of the players on the vera- 
city team flunked?" 

* * • 

When a fhnikey saw a zebra. 
He began to switi-h his tail: 
"Well I never," was his comment 
"There's a mule that's been in jail." 

Fishy 

"Madam, here's a man at the door 
with a parcel for you." 

"What is in it. Maggie?" 

"It's Hsh, ma'jini. an" it's marked *'. 
O. D." 

"Tell him lo take it back: 1 ordered 
trout. " ♦ * * 

Well Brought Up 

Teacher^"Katherine. what tlo yon 
know about the orchard family?' 

Katie— "IMease. miss, mother has for 
bidden us to indulge in any family 
gossip." 

Efficiency in Buying 
Sub— "How much for those rolls?" 
Maid — "Two for a nickel." 
Sub — "How much for one'" 
Maid — "Three cents." 
Suit — "(Jive me the other one." 

* » * 

IM-ond wife (to uervtKis friend in 
autoUHvbilei— "I feel so safe with 
(ieorue driving, now that he has jrdned 
the Ued Cross. He is learning hrst aid. 
;ind knows where all the hospitals are." 

* « * 

"\\'hy don't you eat your ap|de. 
.1 ohnnv ? ' 

"I'm waiting fi.r Teter. It tastes 
much better when another feller is 
looking cm." 

"Did any of you ever see an ele 
phant's skin ?" in(|Uired the teacher itf 
the infant class. 

"I have," exclaimetl one. 

"Where?" asked the teacher. 

•■(hi the elephant," replied the Suit. 

* * * 

S(tpii : -"Did you have any optitnis 
oil ynur algebra examinatioTi ? " 

l-'reshnian : — ^"No, we haven't gotten 
that far yet." 




■a 



jdUfwy 








Smart Sub 

Siili :-!>() yon know th:i( ji hahy that 
\v;is fed uii 4'lciili;in1 's milk, j^jiiiied 20 
jMiiitnis in iitu' wtM'k '!" 

Snpli: — "NonstMisc ! I tninissihlc ! Whnsp 
l)ii)»y was itV" 

Siih :~"The cl.'iilia iit s." 



I>(iris: — "Oh .Miss rat,^'. I'm scaml 
|iink." 

.Miss I'a^e. (with an imiiiirin^ ex- 
ltr<^ssion)— "An* ymi surf that's what 
makes you so iiinkV 



Soph : — "Miss Abt-rnathy. wlio wrolr 

Caesar V" 
Miss Abernathy : — Caesar wrote it." 
Alice: — "I thtdijrht Mr. Bennett wrote 

it." 

* * * 

"What have you been iloiii^ all 
Summer ':" 

"I h;Hl a jiosition in mv lathers ottiee. 
Ami y(MiV 

"I w:isrri Working' either." 

Clerk : — "Sir. I M like my salary 
raised." 

Boss: — "Well don't worry. I've 

raised it somehow every week s<) far, 
haven't I ?" 



Boy :— "Father do y<.u know that 
every winter an animal puts on a new 
fur coat V" 

Father; — "Hush I uid so loud! Your 
mother's in the next room." 



Miss Fliseh :- "Where was Ihe (irst 
Hutch Settlement '.'" 

Sara Belle:— "On <'oney Island." 

* « « 
Awful 

Pressed in lier father's trousers. 
A silly maid one .hiv 
Went and eh.ped with a fellow: 
Whal will the papers say V 

Kead then the startlinjr headline 
(Such are the whims of chance) 
That spran;; next day from the 

liresses. 
"Flees in Papa's I'ants." 

* • ♦ 

"James, have you whispered today 
without permissioTi '.'" 
"Only wnnst." 

"Jack, should have said wunsi '/" 
"No'in. he should have said twict." 

* * « 

"Martha Hill :— "(Juess what ! After 
Fxams we are ;;oinjr to have a "faculty 
take off." 

Elizabeth Storey: — "(irand! Where are 
you ;,'()injr to take them ■.'" 

* • * 

An Irishman, hearing; of a friend who 
had a st<ine coffin made for himself. 
exidaimed : 

"Faith, that's jiiMid. Sure an' a stone 
cothn would last a man a lifetime." 
« * * 

"How many times do 1 have i<» tell 
you. B(d)by. that one must keep his 
eyes closed durin;j jirayer'/" 

"Yes. mamma, how do you know I 
don't ';" 




NEARING THE END 



AutngrapIjB 



+ + 



FACULTY 













CLASS MATES 










SCHOOL FRIENDS 






1 



Q ^ ^ ^ p, f~^ 

8-JIT(-ie CRAZV QUILT v 



1 







r\A-«-ft -nn\ 



Om TKl. FfNtt 



"SBiEt;>.N(? Bdiun 



uCS^UhATS URONGWiti^ this ficTv„E?^ /^NS-THt^^NT 60T ^.-B«t>|. . !! ^^^^ 



S^rdtnnB 



Talkative Ethel Miller 

Unselfish -inabcl Poivell 

Beautiful Elizabeth Burdcll 

Musical Kathleen Allen 

Athletic Cecilia Baker 

Natural Martha Hill 

Honorable Helen Probyn 

Independent Elina Keener 

Graceful Blanche Lchniann 

Humorous Henrietta Dunn 

Studious Virginia Sez'ter 

Coquettish Doris Speth 

Happ\- Minnie Cohen 

Odd Sarah U'yly 

Original (irace Etheredije 

Lazy Eoiiise Plumb 



II ii 







©«U 







Hot D.6S ,, ( ,•: 1 



The U>.se1^">sh' 

ONE 




\4^ ' / ^ 

™A&v, Kathleen 



MOST TALKATIVE 

Ethel Miller 

Some people are born to hear 
The speeches that others do make. 

But words can flow 

From some girls so. 
In talking our VAhe\ takes the cake. 



MOST UNSELFISH 

Anabel Powell 

My heart is ever at your service. 
And I know no better way 

Than to live to give. 

And give as I live. 
And so help the world day l)y day. 



MOST BEAUTIFUL 
Elizabeth Burdell 

Beauty, beauty where art thou? 

Cleopatra and Venus could tell 
Their beauty was famed 
But they'd he shamed 

Bv the heautv of Babv Burdell. 



MOST MUSICAL 

Kathleen Allen 

We've never heard Patti or Ciluck, 
But we don't despair of that, 
For lucky are we 
As we've heard y<iu see 
The golden \'oi<*e of "Kat." 



r^oi,c«v. <0««,V. 



MOST ATHLETIC 

Cecilia Baker 

Athenians were skillful «e ]<now 
On every line athletic. 

Hut (•(iin|)ared with Teto 

We'd venture to show 
They would certainly look most pathetic. 



MOST NATURAL 

Martha Hill 

She who liath an affected air 
May think herself truly clever, 
Hut the girl worth while 
Is the one with a smile, 
In anv kind of weather. 



MOST HUMOROUS 

Henrietta Dunn 

Jolly good humor seems to me, 
To be as bright as the sun. 
And when a girl has it 
She makes a l)ig hit 
Like our Henrietta Tunn. 



MOST INDEPENDENT 

Elma Keener 

Her birthday should be the glorious fourth 
Of independence she is so fond. 

Ted Koosevclfs not in it 

iUit she's up to the minute 
She's a regular Liberty liloiul. 



T)vjnBen.(^?j 




THE Hv.r-iOI\oui — 



'^' 



K ^ 








- c= 




<o>^v- 










<-, ■> 



j)o«^lS- Ou(\ Co(^o%TTi 



MOST GRACEFUL 

Blanche Lehmann 

The gods indeed gave grace 
To the fairies and n_vni])lis of old; 
But they'd scanijier away 
Sliould they some day 
'I'he graee of Blanclie hehold. 



MOST HONORABLE 

Helen Probyn 

"Honesty is the hest policy" 
Is a saying old and true. 
For honor is right. 
And truth's the light 
To which Helen is true hlue. 



MOST STUDIOUS 
Virginia Sevier 

Books are the steps to knowledge, 
Xot always easy to ascend, 

But Virginia goes up 

Quite easy enough 
As her eves to studv do lend. 



MOST COQUETTISH 
Doris Speth 

There are dignified ways and ways that 

are wise. 
And all very well are tliey. 

But this sly young miss 

With a wink and a kiss 
Is a maid cocjuettish and gay. 



HAPPIEST 

Minnie Cohen 

Take life easy and never fret. 
For the hardest thinfrs to win 

Can ever l>e won. 

And you'll have more fun 
If you only laufrh and frrin. 



ODDEST 

Sarah Wyly 

The world a dull place would he 

If everyhody were the same. 
But variety's the spice 
Which is bought without price, 

And with it Sarah makes our classes less 
tame. 



MOST ORIGINAL 
Grace Etheredge 

"Tis a saying that's been overdone 
That there's nothing new under the sun, 

Hut when tirace came along 

We found 'twas all wrong 
For she's got 'em all beat on tin- run. 



LAZIEST 

Louise Plumb 

".\h, why should life be all labor? 
Just let the world go by. 

For life's a sleep. 

That's gentle and deep. 
With dreams of pudding and pie." 






3DDE^T 
I" 







^ 




Ot>D Gi«.u 




iV 





Grace 



CTHtREOsE. — ftfcgHfyr^rrtX' 




(Eaknfiar, 1922-23 



+ + 




Sept. ISth— Lost— 200 Sub Freshmen ! Fiiuler 
please return to utfice.^Schdol starts! 

Sept. l!lth — Mucli weei>i[i<.' and wailin^^ and 
^nashin;; of teeth^work hej^ins. Seninrs find life 
is not a bed of roses, 

Sept. JTtli— Schedules are annoniu-t'd perfect — 
committee heaves a sijrh of relief, 

Ot't. IHth — (ireat excitement — aspiring: chemists 
try to blow the ceilinj? off the lab. but only 

succeed in breakiufr a flash. 





Oct. 2Gth — I'ncon trolled joy— half holiday an- 
nounced — children's day at circus. 

Xiiv. 7th — Curtain run;; down on Kotarians. 
Mr. Garrett leads quartet which sinjjs "Will 
Spearmint Lose Its B^lavor on the Bed Post Over 
Xight." Sophomores outshine fnotli^rhts in grym. 
exhibition. 



Xuv, UKh - Klont;ated far 
■ards given out. 



appear — report 



Nov. 20th — Tramp, tramp, tramp, 1 lie girls are 
marching I First walking contest takes i»hice. 

Nov. 2!lth— Astronomers make astoundiiig dis- 
covery. Tubman's musical stars shine in brilliant 
concert. 

Dec, l.")th— Merry Christmas! Santa Claus 
Hickman lirings us a concert, also candy fi»r the 

performers. Forty -nine idieers for Mi'. Mick 
man ! 




Jan. .">th !>r. Harker- I nspin-d TnlMuanites — 
New resolutions — Broken backs^Cracked skulls — 
"Let your conscience lie your guide." — Finis I 

.Tan. luili— Weary Seniors search tlie street-car 
for unwary bacteria t<» Insect in bicdngy class. 



Jan. 11 th— Uah ! Rah ! Seniors— Kati ! Rah ! 
Junifirs I Interclass liasket ball jiiinips. 

Jan. 2Sth— Hurry calls for Kllidtt ! Dnnibells 
pass out— of style I Kxains. 

Marrh 1st— Kiwaiiians f..llo\v style set by Ro- 
tarians— Knjciy a IuiicIhmhi at Tulinian. 

Warch LMid — Tiilmiini aiinihilales Atlanta team. 
Snsie's Kami ami Wild Nell i-<»ver themselves 
with jiinry. 

March i»th— Our lirst (lefeat ! i Sh— sh ! Red 
headed woman at the bottom of it I) Senior as- 
troncimeps disai>i)ointed in stars — but not in "hot 
dojrs." 

Mari-h l.'»th- Annual staff cidlapse — Annual jroes 
to press. 

March Hith — Mr. (Jarrett startled out of years 
p:rowth, by Tubman's unanimous vote for red 
knickers as uniforms I 

March li:ird— Tubman ites -walk away with the 
Capital aitrain in Basket Ball. 

April 0th — Field meet — Winner overwhelmed 
with joy — silver cup as reward for her hard 
labors ! 

Ai)ril ]:Uh — Senior stunt day wante<l, by Tub- 
nianites. soniethin;;- to sonthe sore hands (caused 
by clapping)- 

April llth^T>iy:nified Seniors jump down froui 
I heir exhaUed iiedestals and join iu a Irolic with 
I lie "kids" I .[ iiiiiors f- "M 'url'ew shall not rin^' 

tonitfht :■' 

April 14th— ■■Daffy-Dills" presente*! by Glee 
Clul)." 

May 1st — Tubman nymphs make debut — Feast 
lor hungry eyes— (and ;roats) — May Festival. 

.1 mo- mill |!;i.-(;il;iiir.'ale Srrnion. 

.Inne Ulh Gradual ion V I] I] V 




PEB^ 


™-f^, 




i''-^ 

-^ 


r 






GOOD^DYEr, 





■¥"i"|"^IT¥ 



m 

i 





Girls and Savings 



The Bank for Savings has something to offer which 
adds to the attractiveness of any girl. Love, beauty and 
winsomeness cannot of course be stated in terms of money. 
But the habit of thrift, the love of simplicity, and the 
absence of extravagance which the Savings habit gives to 
a girl do much to insure the permanence of her attractive- 
ness. 

YOU'D BE SURPRISED 

Money spent is gone. Money stolen is dreadful. 
Money lost is too bad. Money in your pocket is skittish. 
Money in the Bank — you'd be surprised. Try it. Open a 
Savings Account. 




GEORGIA RAILROAD 

BANK 



^)^.^.wmMmmms^mm!^WyW>WMM^ 




mMmWi^mwikW/^''M''mwMmwm-^^^ 




iiiiiiiiii iir 





HEN the question of engraving is be- 
ing considered, the conditions un- 
der which they are to be printed, 
the kind of ink tliat they will print; ■ 
and the class of stock on which they 
are to be used, should all be taken under consider- 
ation. 

The engravings used in this book were made 
with a thought for each of these things. We firnily 
believe in quality, and attribute to it our prosper- 
ity in the Annual field. This year we are handling 
twice the amount of engraving we did last year. 

Next year our representatives will have a larg- 
er and more beautiful line of samples. Of course, 
it is to your advantage to call on them when you 
are ready. 

One last word to the staff that produced this 
book: We have enjoyed serving you and we feel 
that you have done your work well. Please remem- 
ber that we are always glad to hear from you and 
if you need us on commercial work our organiza- 
tion is at your service. 

Jacrobsi IE: Co. 

College Annual Specialists 
CLINTON, SOUTH CAROLINA 





+ — 



4. 




Drink Coca Cola in Bottles 

Delicious and refreshing 

The bottles are sterilized 



A ugusta 
Coca-Cola 
Bottling 
Company 



* — 



tubman l^tglf ^rl|0ol 



FOR GIRLS 



CkEstahlished fifty years. Seven 
hundred and fifty students, 
thirty- five teachers in 1922-23. 

C®Thoroughly modern building 
and equipment. 

C®Ofiers the following Courses: 

Co liege- Prep a ra to ry, Modern - 
Language, Science and Com- 
mercial. 



T. H. GARRETT, 

Principal 



+ — 



+. — 



G. Lloyd Preacher 
& Company 



INCORPORATED 



Architects and Engineers 






OFFICES 

LAMAR BUILDING HEALEY BUILDING 

AUGUSTA, GA. ATLANTA. GA. 

COM. NAT. BK. BLDG. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE UMV£H»AL CAto 



AUTOMOBILES AND TRUCKS 



CHEAPER NOW THAN EVER BEFORE 



SALES 



SERVICE 



PARTS 



HOWARD-HOLDEN 
MOTOR CO. 



521-523 BROAD STREET 



PHONE 357 




TWIN FALLS FLOUR MIUS 

TWIN FALL_S, IDAHO 
Idahome Flour 

BLEACHED 

tOAfiOME FLCnS 



"BREAD IS THE STAFF OF LIFE" 
For a Dependable Staff Use 

IDAHOME FLOUR— Plain 
TWINIDA FLOUR— Self-Rising 

MAKES PERFECT BISCUIT, ROLLS, 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



CARR-LEE GROCERY CO. 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 



+ 



+ 



HilVs Mixture 

Kills 

Boll Weevil 



'■\\'liy, S.-iiinuy," siiiil ;! loiiil iiLdtlicr to her little son," I diilii't 
kimw yipur tcaclicr whipped you last Friday." 

"I niifss," 111' replied, "if yon liad been in my trousers you'd 
liiiow'd it." 






You II Like Our Work 

We have enjoyed a period of successful operating for over tvi^enty-five 
years. We are offering you QUALITY WORK and PROMPT SER- 
VICE, Those dainty shirt waists and flimsy negligee will be prop- 
erly handled and carefully laundered. In fact if it's anything to be 
laundered remember — 



Hulse Laundry 

"Just a Good One" 
513 PHONES 6871 



.+ 



STELLING SHOE CO 

810 BROAD STREET 

Retailers of 
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR 

"YOUR INSPECTION INVITED" 



He seized her in tlie dark and kissed her. 
For a moment l)liss was liis. 
■■Oil." he said. "I tlimiKlit it was m.v sister." 
She laughed and said. ■It is." — Medle.v. 



The 

National Exchange 

Bank 

"AUGUSTA'S ONLY NATIONAL BANK" 

A NATIONAL BANK 

With 

A SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

In Which 

EVERY TUBMAN GIRL IS CORDIALLY INVITED TO HAVE 

A SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

START WHILE YOUNG 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE BANK 



— + 



Paliner-Spivey Construction 
Company 



i 



BUILDERS OF THE NEW TUBMAN ! 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



I 



Prexy — "liCt iiic try oii tli.Ml suit in the wiiidciw. my 
good man." 

("Ici-k — "Son-y. sir. Imt you'll h.-ivc lo nsr tlu' dri'ssini;' 
room." — AVasliinKton Congar's I'aw. 



i 
1 

Compliments j 



I 



MODJESKA - IMPERIAL 

RIALTO 

THEATRES 



Lorick & Vaiden Agency 

LAMAR BUILDING 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

LIFE INSURANCE MORTGAGE LOANS 



SPEAKING OF DIMBELLS— 

iliss Fliscli : ■'Miiry. who wrote tlic Di-chiratidii of IiidepeiKlfUce?" 
Mary : "AlirMlunn Lincoln." 



Herff-Jones Company 

CLASS PINS CLASS RINGS 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS AND 
CALLING CARDS 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



The Citizens and Southern 
BANK 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

4' . Paid on Savings Quarterly. Start Life Right by Opening a 

Savings Account 

TOTAL ASSETS OVER $70,000,000.00 
NO ACCOUNT TOO LARGE— NONE TOO SMALL 



Dora — "I hear that Alice is a Wdnilcft'ul li(irsewi>inaii. Tlioy 
say she even rides harehack." 

Absent-iuinded Mothei' — "I{eally, it's a wimiler she (hiesii't tal;e a 
severe cold." — Drexerd. 



CONGRATULATING 

ANOTHER CLASS OF TUBMAN GRADUATES 

—The Class of 1923! 

Remember, girls, you are among our most valued customers. We 
want to be of real service to you, now, and on thru the FUTURE — 
that wonderful time that is just opening up for you. It is our ambi- 
tion to supply you with the things you want, at prices that represent 
fullest value to you. That is our justification for being in this busi- 
ness of selling. 

If we can help NOW with the graduation 
wardrobe and accessories — LATER with 
college equipment. Please let us do so. 




BARRETT & CO., Inc. 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

THE LARGEST COTTON FACTORS 
IN THE WORLD 



Maria — ".Tdlui. John, set up: the gas is leaking!" 
John — "Aw. put :i \>nu under it and come to lied.' 



Augusta-Aiken Railway & 
Electric Corporation 

POWER LIGHT HEAT 

STREET CAR SERVICE 

Good Wishes for the Tubman Girls 
Expressed in Efficient Service 



I 




;^ I V a ft ^ 

THAT SATISFY 
At Prices That Please 

We Are Prepared— 

For the "Sweet Girl Graduate" who wants the correct styles for 

Spring and Summer. 

You must see our wonderf"! variety of styles to appreciate our 

efforts to please you. 

Special Discount Given on Footwear fo'' Commsncement. 

Saxon-Cu^mS/TocCa 



AmMSBUSY 









T. R. HENDERSON & CO. 

Distributors of 

GARDNER'S FAMOUS CAKES 
SUNSHINE BISCUITS 





WE SUPPLY TUBMAN GIRLS 
WITH SUNSHINE BISCUITS 

436 EIGHTH STREET 



PHONE 2333 



Build With Brick or Tile 

Whether it be solid brick, Ideal brick wall, all tile, or tile 
faced with brick, you will have the most durable, safest, 
most economical, and most comfortable house that can be 
built. 

Will be glad to tell you why. 

Georgia-Carolina Brick 
Company 

HOWARD H. STAFFORD, President AUGUSTA, GA. 



A reporter was niisiiiforuied about some news, and the 
editor was called up. 

Ueporter — 'I see in your paper tliat I am dead?" 

Editor — "Yes, wliere are .von spealving from." 



. + 



FLOWERS 



FOR ALL OCCASIONS 






227 EIGHTH STREET 
'Augusta's Telegraph Florist" 




4,.—..—.. 



SPECIAL DESIGNS 

AND MOLDS FOR ALL 

OCCASIONS 




Georgia-Carolina Dairy Products 

Company 



PHONES 2761-2762 



925-927 WALKER ST. 



+. — 



■ + 
■+ 



BAKERS 

AMERICA 

LBv Invilation OnlvJ 



You learned at school that bread 
contains more nutriment than is 
to be found in any other single 
food. Remember it, and always 
demand — 



Georgia's 

Finest 

Bread 






* 



1 HATS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 

- MEN'S WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S— EVERY 

SHAPE AND STYLE MADE 



SHERON'S 



678-80 BROAD STREET 



STULB'S RESTAURANT 



OPPOSITE MONUMENT 

735 BROAD STREET 



W. J. Heffernan Proprietors Carl P. Byne 



TOMMINS 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

852 BROAD PHONE 2314 



The Realty Savings & Trust Co. 

827 BROAD STREET 

Solicits and appreciates the Savings accounts of young ladies 

We j 5^% on time certificates 
Pay ( 5'/r on savings accounts 

(All deposits secured by First Mortgage on Improved Augusta 
Real Estate.) 

J. LEE ETHEREDGE. President J. FRANK CARSWELL. Vice-President 

LEROY W. LYETH. Secretary-Treasurer 



.+ 






ESTABLISHED 1858 



The Perkins Manufacturing Company 

YELLOW PINE LUMBER 
MILL WORK, DOORS, SASH AND BLINDS 

j 620 13th St. AUGUSTA, GA. Phone 3 
+ — , + 



Phone 2036 and say: "SEND ME THE HERALD" 
Compliments of 

The Augusta Herald 

THE HOME NEWSPAPER 

The ONLY paper in many homes 
The ONE paper in most homes 



McGowan Murphy Shoe Co. 

984 BROAD ST. PHONE 1407 



Lockhart, McAuliffe & Co. 

REAL ESTATE, RENTING, GENERAL INSURANCE 

807 BROAD STREET AUGUSTA. GA. 



+ 

i 
i 
! 
I 
i 
1 

Everything in Footwear and Always Lower in Price | 

GYM SHOES OUR SPECIALTY i 






■■+ +■■ 



.. . + 






Smith Bros. 
Company 

Wholesale 

GROCERS AND GRAIN 
DEALERS 

Specializing 

RICHLAND LILLY 

Plain 

SWEET ROSE 
Self-Rising 






Incorporated 



PRINTERS 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



. — + +.. 



ELLIS ICE & COAL CO. 



QUALITY 



-+ 

■■+ 



+■■ 
1 



WHEN IN THE MARKET FOR JEWELRY 

M. TANENBAUM 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Silverware and Optical Goods 
Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty 



1154 BROAD STREET 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



Gifts That Last 



. — + +.. 



Compliments of 

Q^i}t AurjUBta 
(Eltrontrlr 

The South's Oldest 
Newspaper 



1.. J. SCHAliL & CO. 

Diamonds 

and 

Jewelry 

«4() Broad Street 
Phone 545 

Augusta. Georgia 



. + 



■"Ho, Hum I There*.'^ nothing new under the sun." 
"No, and there'.s s\\stt a hit of oUl stutT ijtiUed olT 
unchT a full moon." — .le.ster. 



4. 



I 

1 
I 



Girls ! 
Remember. 



You want to be 
UP-TO-DATE of course, 
and let us install for you 
a modern All-Gas kitchen 
when you start 
to HOUSEKEEPING. 



The Gas Light Co. 

OF AUGUSTA 



. — + 



Murphy 

Stationery 

Company 

High Grade Correspondence 
Papers and Cards 

ENGRAVING 

GRADUATION AND GIFT 

BOOKS 

Waterman Fountain Pens 
KODAKS and FILMS 



•.+ +.- 



HOME 
BAKERY 

NOTED FOR QUALITY 

CAKES, PASTRIES 
BREAD AND ROLLS 



310 8th St. 



Phone 306 



I 



Ely Construction 
Company 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

ASPHALT PAVING 



Fiitlicr— -Tlu- next tiinc lljut .vouiij;- focil ,-,,iii,.s iiniiuid 
lu'i'e I'll sit (111 him." 

I>:ninlit<'r — ••(111, Piijiii. U'iivt' tluit to iiie." — Ij.vre. 



+, 



+ +. 



Personal Beauty 

Is a Better Introduction Than Any 
Letter — Diogenes. 

ELIZABETH ARDEN 



Preparations Combine All That i 

Could Be Desired to Make j 

Your Dressing Table i 

Complete ' 

1 

You Will Find Also at Our Store i 

A Complete Line of Unicum 

Hair Nets 



GARDELLE'S 



726 BROAD STREET 



+ 4- 



L. J. HENRY 

"THE TYPEWRITER MAN" 

REMINGTON 

MONARCH 

SMITH PREMIER and 

REMINGTON-PORTABLE 

TYPEWRITERS 



129 8th Street 



Augusta. Georgia 



CASH AND CARRY 
SELF SERVICE 

Carpenter's 
50-50 

Grocerteria 



WE DELIVER ORDER 
OF $10 OR MORE 



710 Broad St. 



+ . 



Phone 3649 



That float or sundae 
tastes much better at 

King's 

Make your date take 
you there. 



NORRIS' CANDY 



HOW SHE DH) IT 

"So yim ;;iit yimr iiiiciii priiiti'd?" 

"Yes." replied the iuitlior: "1 sent tlie tirst stiiiiz;! te the 
editor of the ((irresiioiidence edlninii with tlie iiKpiiry. ■Cnji 
iinyoue Kive me tlie rest of this imh'IhV Then I sent in the 
complete poem oyer another name." 



! 

I 



Miirphey &, 
Company 

Est. 1844 

WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



Augusta's Oldest Business 
Establishment 



Trowbridge 

Hardware 

Company 

L. F. TROWBRIDGE, Prop. 

Devoe Paints, Beaver Board, 
Rubber Roofing, Wire Fence, 
Harness, Saddles, Screen, Door 
and Window. 

Syracuse Plows 
A Specialty 

WHOLESALE WAREHOUSE 
637-639-641 Twiggs St, 

RETAIL STORE— 847 Broad Street 



— * +.. 

I I 



MORRISON 

SATISFACTORY 
CONTRACTOR 



112 EIGHTH ST. 
Phone 288 



QUALITY GARDEN 
HOSE 

HUTT'S 

PLUMBING 
SUPPLIES 



4. , 



I i 

.4 I . ._.„ 



liiidy (t(i (InuiU I — "Hiiw KS'ii'I't" • 

DiMiuU — "Fine, tliiiuks. Ilnw f;(ifs<-li it with yim'; 

Sp;ii-k — "ril iriMtcli yciii for this tlivvur." 
I'liig — "Not mi yiiur lifr. I iiii^lil win." 



■■+ +... 



ART MATERIALS 

FROM 

MILTON BRADLEY 
COMPANY 



ATLANTA. GA. 



Tonal Tempera Poster Colors 
Buckeye Poster Boards 

Bradley Water Color Paints 



4 Colors 
40 cents 



8 Colors 
50 cents 



16 Colors 
One Dollar 



The Largest Stock in the South 

ORDERS FILLED THE DAY 
RECEIVED 



I 



LOMBARD 

IRON WORKS 

& SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

MACHINERY, SUPPLIES 

REPAIRS. CASTING 

ROOFING, PUMPS 

EVERYTHING FOR THE 
MILL 



•+ +. 



Goetclihis ' 



Broad and Seventh Sts. 



DRUGS 



SODA WATER 
KODAKS 
i CANDY 



Goetchius ' 



George C. Blanchard 



Francis A. Calhoun 



Blanchard & 
Calhoun 

REAL ESTATE 

Insurance 
Investment Securities 

Homes for Sale Convenient to 
TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

MARION BUILDING 
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



+ ^ ^ 



INTKEPIDITY 

III slie came 
Down she sot 
S:nv the ciuestioiis 
Ami (lilt she got. 



"The heroiiii' wiilkeil aft." 
"What dill the hem diiY" 
"He walked after ! ' 



! 

I 



THESE TWO 
FEEDS MAKE fi 

STURDY 
CHICKS 

I 





+- 

I 



— 4. 



The best 
by test 
sold only in 
Checkerboard 
Ba^s by— — 



(ONMMEKS <.KO( ERY CO. 
I>istributor*. for I'lirina Feeds 
riione -,Wi liril HniiKl 




LADIES" OUTFITTERS 

Our Authentic Styles and Mod- 
erate Prices Have Earned 
for this Store the Repu- 
tation of 

"THE STORE OF BETTER 
VALUES" 



•■+ + 



. — + 



GIRLS' SHOP 

We specialize in Hosiery, 
Athletic Sweaters, Coats, Reg- 
ulation Middies and Dresses 
for Girls. 

Agents for Spalding's 
Athletic Goods 

Madge Evans Hats 
for Girls 



4..- 



Buy 

The Tubman 
Girls 

GRADUATION 
GIFTS 

AT 



Schweigert's 

The Leading Jeweler 



•■S;iin)iii. (lid ycm evov si'e the ("atskill .Mountains?"' 
"Xd. siili. Imt I've seen 'em kill mice." 



•■+ +— 



WHITNEY-McNEILL 
ELECTRIC CO. 

BEAUTIFUL BOUDOIR LAMPS AND 
CURLING IRONS 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES. ETC. 



S41 liRO.XD .ST. 



Ph..iie i;;iii 



I 
+ 






ALEXANDER & GARRETT 

FIRE INSURANCE, LOANS 
REAL ESTATE 



LAMAR BLDG. 



AUGUSTA. GA, 






Augusta Stock 
Yard Company 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
Leaders in 

HORSES AND MULES 

CAN SUPPLY YOUR WANTS 
AND SAVE YOU MONEY 



W. p. MANNING MUSIC CO. j 

Augusta's Exclusive Music I 

Store j 

Steinway Pianos, Columbia Grafo- j 

nolas I 



Phone 3327 



311 EIGHTH ST. 



W. A. McGAHEE 
RESTAURANT 

•WE FEED THEM ALL" 

548 BROAD STREET 



+■■ 



CLOTHING AND SHOES 
ON INSTALLMENT 

MASTERS & AGEE 

931 BROAD ST. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



■■+ 



+- 



I I 
I I 

i I 
I I 



■+ 



Maxwell Brothers 
FURNITURE 

937 Broad St. Phone 836 

Augusta, Georgia 



I 



I)(iris — William means "jtood." James means 
"beloved." And i blushing I I wonder what O.s- 
w."»lil means? 

P'atlier — Let's hope he means Imsiness. 

■ — (Jargojie. 



I 



LAND DRUG CO. 

Broad and Twelfth Sts. 

Drugs, Toilet Articles, Candy, I 



Cigars and Soda Water 



I 
+■■ 



YOU SAVE BY TRADING 
WITH US 

Herman's Self-Service 
GRGCERTERIA 

1286 BROAD ST. 



■■+ 

I 



Heath, Bolster & Turner 

Wholesale 

Fruits, Produce, Groceries 
Cor. Washington and Fenwick Sts. 



1 1 

I I Phones 1271-1272 

I I 

i i 
+ + 

+ 



Augusta. Ga. 



I I 



PICTURE FRAMING 

We solicit your patronage in 
Picture Framing. We guaran- 
tee workmanship and goods of 
the best quality. Respectfully, 

Harper Bros. Art Store 

426 Eighth St. Phone 730 



•+ 

f 



+ + . . . . + 



♦ 






Awn 


ngs 


Porch Shades 
Wall Paper 


T. 


G. 


BAILIE & CO. 




712 


BROAD STREET 



+ H 

GRADUATING SLIPPERS 


— At— 


MULHERIN & MARKS 


SHOE CO. 


Leaders in 


Ladies', Gents' and Children's 


FINE FOOTWEAR 

, . ..- —4 



+ 

J- 


+ 

A. MULLARKY CO. 


830 


BROAD ST. PHONE 290 




The most reliable store 
to buy your Dry Goods 
and Ready-to-Wear. 


COME IN THANK YOU 
. ..-.. 



+ 



I 



We Specialize in Tennis 
and Gymnasium Shoes 

BOSTON SHOE STORE 



907 Broad St. 



Pho 



2672 



■-■+ 



She : "You are always late." 
He : "1 am not ; when I gdt there this evening 
you were l)arely dressed. " 
She : "Don't get fresh. ' 



* . 



— ,._.+ 



For Best Building Materials 
Call on 

Youngblood Roofing and 
Mantel Company 

635 Broad St., Augusta, Ga. 



.\ IIOl SK (\X DKrKKCI.VTE S.VDLY 
IX A FKW VK.VKS WITHOl T P.VINT: 

After all. it costs more not to 
paint than to paint. Rust and 
rot go on till you check them. 
Paint and varnish NOW, or 
you'll pay far more, later, for re- 
pairs and replacements. DON'T 
PUT IT OFF— PUT IT ON. 
"Save the surface and you 
save all. 
"YOU CAN GET IT AT McDANIEL'S" 

A. H. McDANIEL 

434 8th Street AUGUSTA, OA. 

.Material Front Foundation to Koof 



WEINGARTEN-McNAIR 



I 
J 



■■+ 
I 



758 BROAD ST. 



i 
] 

I Ladies' Wearing Apparel Ex- 
I clusively 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



E. J. Hernlen 



Fred Herring 



-+ 

-+ 
I 

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VvTRTZ & HERNLEN 
COMPANY 

Dealers in 

Hardware and 

Farm Machinery 

The John Deere Line 

601 BROAD ST. PHONE 3604 



SIBERT & ROBISON 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Ilcuse Builders, Repairs and Alter- 
ations, Fire Damage Appraisals 
and Estimates. 

Union Savings Bank Building 



<..— .. 



SIKES COAL & WOOD 
COMPANY 

C7 Years Satisfactory Service 

PHONE 2151 



+ .+ 



RUBENSTEIN'S 



THREE PIECE SUITS, 

CAPES, SPORT COATS 

AND DRESSES 



■•+ 
I 

i 



+. — 



+■■ 

1 



+ 4., 



RINKER-DEAS PAINT 
COMPANY 

Estab. 1910 

Home of Gold Seal Paints 

915-917 ELLIS ST. 214 9TH ST. 

AUGUSTA. OA. 



At ;l hall, a .vouiif;' man iiaiiiPd St. .loliii 
Wildl.v siisppil, "M.v susjit'iKler St. ()lin." 

Hut his partner replied 

In a nervous "a" side." 
"Don't worry, your trousers St. Gohn." 



+ 

RINKER 


PAINT 


. 

AND 


GLASS CO. 




OPPOSITE 


NEW Y. M. 


C. A. 


948 Broad Street Augusta, Ga. 


Phone 7* 


Ph 


1 
3ne 74 j 



+■■ 



PALMER, PHINIZY & 
CONNELL 



SALES. 

SERVICE 

and 

PARTS 

627-629 BROAD 
STREET 

Phone 3333 

AUGUSTA. GA. 




i 



C. T. PUND & CO. 

Grocers' Specialties 

Agents for 

GELFAND'S Combination Relish 

and Mayonnaise 



I 
+■■ 



■+ 

I 



If the Panel Has Green Moulding 
That's Poster Advertising 

MILLIGAN ADV. 
SERVICE 



+ — 



VISIT 

THE COZY STORE 

Where you will find new and well 
selected stocks of 

MILLINERY, 

UNUSUAL GIFTS 

NOVELTIES 

E. C. BALK & CO. 



918 BROAD ST. 



PHONE 382 



+- 
+■- 



I 



J. C. ANDERSON 
Meat Market and Groceries 

POULTRY AND EGGS A 
SPECIALTY 

Phone 23o6 608 Broad St. 

Augusta, Ga. 



BOWEN BROS. 
HARDWARE CO. 

829 BROAD ST. PHONE 94 

BASKET BALLS, TENNIS 

GOODS, SWEATERS, 

SPORTING GOODS OF 

EVERY KIND 



4 



Superior Ice Cream 
and Dairy Products 

AUGUSTA CREAMERY 



628-630 Ellis St. 



Phones 1968-1969 



4.-.. 



StiiKc Miiii;igt»r — "All rif; 
(Jrci'ii St;if;cliini<l — "Sii.v, 



lit, run 111) tlip ciirtaiii." 
wliiitiliii tliliik I am — a stiiiiiTfl?" 

— I'urple rnri'drr. 



AVhiit Evpr.v Yoiiiij; (iirl Slidiild Know — Less. 



— Jutlge. 



AUGUSTA DRUG CO. 

Wholesale Druggists 
305 to 311 JACKSON ST. 

Augusta, Georgia 







When You Get Your Husband, j 
May We Not Furnish Your 
Happy Home? 



■+ 

■f 



W. W. Jones W. M. Jones W. K. Jones 

AUGUSTA ROOFING & 
METAL WORKS 

Approved Roofers for Barrett Specification 

Roofs 
Approved Roofers for Johns-Manville Built- 

Up Roofs 

Anything in Sheet Metal. Slate, Tile, Tin, 

Tar and Gravel Roofing 

529 Broad Street Phone 2683 

AUGUSTA, GA. 






•WE OFFER BETTER VALUES' 
At Lower Popular Prices 

STEINBERG'S 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

1124 BROAD 



I 

+■- 



WILSON FUNERAL 
APARTMENTS 

W. I. WILSON AND SON 
123 7th St. 



+ 4. + 

SOUTHERN WELDING CO. j 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting 

553 BROAD STREET 
Telephone 1332 Augusta, Ga. 



I 



■+ 



+ 

I 






J. WILLIE LEVY & SON 

824 Broad St. 

Ladies and Misses and Girls 
Dresses, Coats and Ready-to-Wear 



+. — 



HANDI-CRAFT SHOP 

Miss Anita Brittingham 



.+ +._, 



+ 



. + 



I 



HICKMAN & KITCHEN 
COTTON 



+■■ 

I 

I 
I 
1 



AUGUSTA SHOE REPAIR- 
ING CO. 

J. Sawilowsky's Shoe Renury 

975 Broad St. 
Phones 943 — 3714 Augusta, Ga. 



THE GIRL HE PINNED 

A sclidol room with a scIkkiI rodui nir ; 

A school boy in his seat. 

A pin sticks from the shoe on one 

Of his extended feet ; 

And with determination grim 

He kicks the girl in front of him. 

— Cracker. 



1 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

J. P. DOUGHTY, JR. 



+ 



THOUSANDS 

of 'I'enni.s and I'lasket Ball 
Sillies a great deal cheaper 
than anyhddy .sells them. 

KEDS A SPECIALTY 

GREAT EASTERN SHOE 
COMPANY 

R. G. TARVER. Mgr. 



DRINK 



Chero-Cola 



"There's None So Good" 



SMITH HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

LAWN MOWERS 

RUBBER HOSE 
Screen Wire and Poultry 
Netting 

927 BROAD STREET 



••+ +.- 



DAVID SLUSKY & SON 

Roofing Materials, Mantels, 

Tiles, Grates, Builders' 

Hardware, etc. 



AUGUSTA 



GEORGIA 



Headquarters for Sporting Goods 
A. J. Reach Co.'s famous line 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

COOPER HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

AUGUSTA'S 

MOST COMPLETE 

HARDWARE STORE 

»T7 BROAD ST. 



+ 



When you need furniture BAD 
you need it GOOD 

CULPEPPER BROS. 

Five Floors Fine Furniture 



+- 



E. O. Cooper 



Wm. M. Nixon, Jr. 



■■+ 

r 



COOPER & NIXON 

GENERAL 
INSURANCE 



Phone 2167 



128 Eighth St. 



+ +.- 



"Are you duiiij; auythiiif; for tliat itchiiiK?" 
"Yes, I"m scratcliing it. ' 

"I wish I knew of soinetliinu' to keep tlie cliap 
off my lips 1" 

"Ever try onions." — I'laniiiifjo. 



T. D. Carey 



Warren Bothwell 



T. D. CAREY & CO. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Liberty Bonds Bought, Sold, Quoted 



BAILIE-EDELBLUT FUR- 
NITURE CO. 
THE QUALITY STORE 

708-710-712 BROADWAY 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHINGS 
Second Floor 



CAPLE ELECTRIC CO. 

210 EIGHTH ST. 
Phone 1106 Augusta, Georgia 



■4 i.. 



Scott 


Nixon Walter 

H. H. BELL 
REALTORS 


G. Fargo 


Real 


Estate, Renting, Fire 
ance, Loans 


Insur- 


104 


\4asonic Building. AuguBta, 


Georgia 



This A/ifiiiciI Printed by 



INCORPORATED 

PRINTERS 

Bookbindi}ig :: :: Ruling 
Lithographing, Engraving 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA